Christopher Marlowe at 450

This is a guest post by Sara Munson Deats

christopher marlowe at 450As the baptism date, if not birthday, of internationally renowned English playwright, poet, and translator Christopher Marlowe, February 26 seems an auspicious day to celebrate the recent publication of Christopher Marlowe at 450. The year 2014 saw the 450th anniversary of Marlowe’s birth. To commemorate this significant anniversary, the book evaluates the scholarship and criticism treating all aspects of the poet/playwright–his biography, his individual poems, including his translations, and his seven plays–to discover what has been covered, what has been neglected, and what areas scholarship and criticism might focus on in the future.

There has never been a retrospective on Marlowe as comprehensive and up-to-date in appraising the Marlovian landscape. Each chapter has been written by an eminent Marlovian scholar, and in addition to considering all of Marlowe’s dramas and poetry, the volume contains chapters exploring the following special topics: critical approaches to Marlowe, Marlowe’s plays in performance; Marlowe and theater history; electronic resources for Marlowe research; and Marlowe’s biography. The volume thus provides an indispensable source of information not only for Marlowe students and scholars but for anyone interested in Renaissance drama and poetry. And because interest in every aspect of Marlowe studies has burgeoned since the turn of the century, it seems appropriate at this time to present a comprehensive assessment of traditional and contemporary approaches, and to predict future lines of inquiry into the life and work of this fascinating poet and playwright.

The book is dedicated to the Marlowe Society of America, and to the cadre of scholars throughout history who have devoted their time and talent to refining our understanding of Christopher Marlowe, and of his contributions to English literature.

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Sara Munson Deats is Distinguished University Professor of English at the University of South Florida, and editor, with Robert A. Logan (Hartford), of Christopher Marlowe at 450.

Contributors to the book: Sara Munson Deats; Robert A. Logan; Ruth Lunney; Tom Rutter; Stephen J. Lynch; Leah S. Marcus; Patrick Cheney; M. L. Stapleton; Richard Wilson; David Bevington; Christopher Matusiak; David McInnis; Constance Brown Kuriyama

Kazuo Ishiguro’s first novel in ten years coincides with new Ashgate volume ‘Kazuo Ishiguro in a Global Context’

Posted by Beth Whalley, Marketing Executive

Cynthia F. Wong and Hülya Yıldız’s edited collection on the work of the Man Booker Prize-winning novelist Kazuo Ishiguro has now been published – coinciding neatly with the arrival of the author’s first novel in a decade, The Buried Giant.

Ishiguro is one of the most celebrated writers of his generation, having won the Booker Prize in 1989 for The Remains of the Day, as well as receiving an OBE for Services to Literature (1995) and the prestigious French decoration of Chevalier de L’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (1998).

Kazuo Ishiguro in a global contextBringing together an international group of scholars, Kazuo Ishiguro in a Global Context offers a fresh assessment of Ishiguro’s growing significance as a contemporary world author. Over the last three decades of interviews and public appearances, the author has been seen to grapple frequently with the ambiguities and contradictions inherent in being an ‘international’ author and writing an ‘international’ novel. By attending to Ishiguro’s career in a global context – via the author’s personal biography from Japan to the UK; by way of the topics and themes explored in his fiction; through the circulation and reception of his works in various editions and languages worldwide; and by presenting a truly global host of contributors – this collection pushes against the literary, political and linguistic borders that Ishiguro calls into question in his own writings.

With new Ishiguro material on the horizon, we are confident that the discussions and debates set into motion by Wong and Yıldız’s volume will adopt fresh relevance and open up new avenues of exploration for those considering literature’s global context in the twenty-first century.

About the Editors: Cynthia F. Wong is Associate Professor of English at the University of Colorado Denver, USA, and Hülya Yıldız is Assistant Professor in the Department of Foreign Language Education at Middle East Technical University, Turkey.

The Islamic Villa in Early Medieval Iberia wins the 2015 Eleanor Tufts Award – Congratulations Glaire D. Anderson!

Posted by Luana Life, Marketing Coordinator

The Islamic Villa in Early Medieval IberiaEvery year the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies recognizes an outstanding publication in the area of Spanish or Portuguese art history. This year the committee has honored Glaire D. Anderson’s book, The Islamic Villa in Early Medieval Iberia with the award and remarked:

‘This publication met and surpassed the stipulated award criteria of “originality of conception, thoroughness of research, rigor of argument, brilliance of insight, significance of findings, and clarity of expression.” Although the book will engage and satisfy specialists in Islamic art and architecture, Anderson’s clear prose makes it accessible and valuable to anyone with an interest in a host of related fields.’ The 2015 Eleanor Tufts Book Award Committee

Previous reviews have also applauded the book:

‘Architects, historians, and art historians, as well as scholars and students of medieval culture, will undoubtedly enjoy Anderson’s book.’   Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review

‘…full of intellectual insights…’   Speculum

‘…an innovative study and an enjoyable read…’   Mariam Rosser-Owen, Victoria and Albert Museum

‘…meticulous study…’   Marcus Milwright, University of Victoria

About the Author: Glaire D. Anderson is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

Learn more about The Islamic Villa in Early Medieval Iberia.

Francis I and Sixteenth-Century France – a guest post from Robert J Knecht

This is a guest post from Robert J Knecht, whose Variorum Collected Studies volume Francis I and Sixteenth-Century France is due for publication later this year.

The publication of my book Francis I and Sixteenth-Century France coincides with celebrations in France marking the fifth centenary of that king’s accession to the French throne in 1515.

Francis I belonged to an illustrious trio of monarchs who dominated Europe in the early sixteenth century, the others being Henry VIII of England and the Emperor Charles V. Soon after his accession, Francis I led a huge army across the Alps and conquered the duchy of Milan after defeating the Swiss – then reputed the leading military power – at the battle of Marignano. Acclaimed as the new Julius Caesar, he remained popular even after he had been defeated and taken prisoner at Pavia in 1525. Under the Bourbon dynasty and the ensuing republic, however, he was largely forgotten. He then suffered at the hands of Victor Hugo and other novelists who portrayed him as little more than a playboy.

But he has now regained his rightful place as a great Renaissance monarch. He is remembered as a notable patron of the arts, who built some of the finest chateaux in France and employed leading Italian artists of his day, including Leonardo da Vinci. He also encouraged learning and built up one of the finest libraries in Europe. But he also had to face serious challenges, none more so than the rise of Protestantism.

In my new volume published under the Variorum imprint, I look more closely at these topics than I was able to do in my biography of the king, published in 1994. In particular, I look at the court, at the roles played by the king’s mother and sister, at his relations with the papacy, at his quarrels with the Parlement of Paris, at the treason of the duke of Bourbon, at the king’s so-called ‘absolutism’ and the political ideas that circulated in his reign, at his relations with Paris, at the building of the chateau of Fontainebleau. Two summit meetings, one with Henry VIII and the other with Charles V, are examined. As an English historian, I compare the attitudes of Francis I and Henry VIII to the Reformation and compare the French and English nobilities. Two essays – one on popular theatre, the other on the soldier-author, Blaise de Monluc – look beyond the reign of Francis.

About the Author: Robert Jean Knecht is Emeritus Professor of French History at the University of Birmingham. A former Chairman of the Society of Renaissance Studies and of the Society for the Study of French History, he is the author of several works on sixteenth and seventeenth century France, including, Richelieu (1991), Renaissance Warrior and Patron: the Reign of Francis I (1994), Catherine de’ Medici (1998), The French Civil Wars (2000), The Rise and Fall of Renaissance France (revised edn. 2001), The Valois (2004), The French Renaissance Court (London & New Haven, 2008) and Hero or Tyrant? Henry III, King of France, 1574-89 (Ashgate, 2014).

‘Loading the Silence’ is joint winner of the Rebecca Coyle Prize

Posted by Maxine Cook, Marketing Assistant

Loading the silenceMany congratulations to Linda Ioanna Kouvaras, whose title, Loading the Silence: Australian Sound Art in the Post-Digital Age, has been awarded joint winner of the 2014 Rebecca Coyle Prize. This year the judges decided there were two titles worthy of the prize, resulting in a second 2014 publication prize being awarded to Loading the Silence. The panel described Loading the Silence as “a highly accomplished piece of scholarship – extensive, rich, complex, well written, and thorough.”

The prize is awarded annually, by the IASPM ANZ, to the best paper on popular music in Australasia. The prize is named in honour of long time IASPM ANZ member, Rebecca Coyle, to commemorate her work advancing popular music studies and mentoring emerging academic talent.

The book has previously received high praise in reviews:

“… Kouvaras has created a reference of vital importance, a book of international significance that is likely to be considered a seminal work in the study of sound art.”   Music Forum

“In Loading the Silence Linda Kouvaras does a real favour for those seeking to learn about and from the political sonicities of the avant garde of the 1970s and since. That she does so in the context of Australian musical practices makes the stories she tells all the more fascinating for those of us regrettably less familiar with that continent’s (sometimes “un-Australian”) experimentality. Refreshingly, Kouvaras’s critical curiosity embraces musical practices and places: the leaky sounds and voicings of women’s bodies, the hospital, the unwatery landscape itself… A convincing critical compendium is the result.”   George McKay, University of Salford, UK

Dr Linda Kouvaras is a Senior Lecturer at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, The University of Melbourne, Australia.

Call for proposals – Green Criminology series

We are currently seeking book proposals, particularly monographs, for our Green Criminology series, edited by Michael J. Lynch (University of South Florida) and Paul B. Stretesky (University of Northumbria).

This series makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the dynamics between the natural world and the quite imperfect human world, and sets the stage for the future study in this growing area of concern.

Now two decades old, green criminology – the study of environmental harm, crime, law, regulation, victimization, and justice – has increasing relevance to contemporary problems at local, national, and international levels. Societies and governments worldwide seek new ways to alleviate and deal with the consequences of various environmental harms as they relate to humans, non-human animals, plant species, and the ecosystem and its components.

Green criminology offers a unique theoretical perspective on how human behavior causes and exacerbates environmental conditions that threaten the planet’s viability. Volumes in the series consider such topics and controversies as corporate environmental crime, the complicity of international financial institutions, state-sponsored environmental destruction, and the role of non-governmental organizations in addressing environmental harms. Titles also examine the intersections between green criminology and other branches of criminology and other areas of law, such as human rights and national security. The series is international in scope, investigating environmental crime in specific countries as well as comparatively and globally.

For more information about the series, including submission guidelines, please send an email enquiry to Alison Kirk, Publishing Manager at akirk@ashgatepublishing.com.

Ashgate and the Modern Language Association, Vancouver edition

Posted by Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager

MLA stand 2015Representing Ashgate at our first MLA experience in Canada, Lea Durfee and I had a thoroughly enjoyable time!  The location was lovely, and the temperatures much milder than in Vermont, our usual base of operation, that particular week.  The Ashgate book display looked great (see picture) and got, we felt, a good reception from the assembled literary scholars.  We especially enjoyed hearing feedback about our book covers (“they really pop!”).

Medical cultures of the early modern Spanish empireInterest in Ashgate titles was strong across the full spectrum of the list, but particular elements seemed to stand out: for example, the New Hispanisms series, and within that series, the volume Medical Cultures of the Early Modern Spanish Empire.

Also of special note was the first unveiling to an MLA audience of a new book series, Among the Victorians and Modernists, General Editor: Dennis Denisoff.

We look forward to reconvening in Austin, next January, to display the latest offerings from our Literary Studies list, and to discuss new book proposals.