Theology and California authors Fred Sanders and Jason S. Sexton at Green Apple Books

Posted by Hattie Wilson, Marketing Executive

Green Apple Books in San Francisco are to host an event with Fred Sanders and Jason Sexton. On Wednesday 15th October at 7pm, Sanders and Sexton will discuss theology in California with Kevin Starr, a Californian State Librarian and University Professor at the University of Southern California. You can view their event page here.

Fred Sanders is evangelical Protestant theologian with a passion for the great tradition of Christian thought and a professor in Biola University’s great books programme, the Torrey Honors Institute. With Oliver Crisp he is the coordinator of the annual Los Angeles Theology Conference, and he is a faculty member for the Los Angeles Bible Training School.

Jason S. Sexton is a fourth generation Californian who taught theology at Cambridge while a visiting scholar at Ridley Hall. He is currently a Research Associate at USC’s Center for Religion and Civic Culture, is a lecturer in the Honors Department at California State University, Fullerton, and is the Administrative Convener of the TECC Project. He holds the PhD from the University of St. Andrews on the doctrine of the Trinity and contemporary evangelical theology.

Theology and CaliforniaAshgate have recently published Sanders and Sexton’s new venture, Theology and California. In the book, the editors gather leading theologians, cultural critics, specialists in film studies, theological anthropology, missiology, sociology and history. Exploring California as a theological place, Theology and California renders critical engagement with significant Californian religious and theological phenomena, and the inherent theological impulses within major Californian cultural icons.

Theology and California is available in paperback, hardback and ebook editions.

Nawal K. Taneja: Should airlines offer more than flights?

Posted by Luigi Fort, Senior Marketing Executive

Should airlines offer more than flights?

A recent whitepaper from the Intelligence Unit of The Economist, entitled, ‘The Future of Air Travel’ examined this question. Its main tenet is that airlines who want to succeed should take control of the full travel chain and offer a complete door-to-door service. If they do not other players will enter the market and snatch the initiative.

Nawal TanejaAmong the top industry leaders interviewed for the document was Ashgate Author Nawal K. Taneja, whose latest book De­signing Future-Oriented Airline Businesses is also referenced in the text.

It quotes him: ‘If the airlines don’t re-strategise and become either travel facilitators or solution providers to the problems that people are facing …if they say, “we just fly seats from Airport A to Airport B,” people will still travel, but they will buy their travel services through new inter­mediaries.’

He maintains that new and cheaper technologies enable airlines to offer this fuller service and to a wide spectrum of customers. ‘We’re not just talking about sending limos to first-class travellers. We’re talking about sending a taxi to an economy-class traveller or suggesting to an ultra-economy-class customer “We know where you live; three blocks away is a bus station; that bus will take you to the subway, which will bring you to the airport.”’

Read The Economist whitepaper and for a deeper perspective read it in conjunction with Nawal K. Taneja’s latest book.

Designing future oriented airline businessesDesigning Future-Oriented Airline Businesses encourages airline managements to take a deeper dive into new ways of doing business.  It also provides a framework for developing strategies and capabilities, as well as executing them efficiently.

A key feature is a concluding section comprising five ‘Thought Leadership Pieces’ from senior executives both in and outside aviation.

‘The Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries’ Short Listed for the Shakespeare’s Globe Book Award

Posted by Ally Berthiaume and Hattie Wilson

Congratulations to Ashgate author, Kevin A Quarmby for being awarded runner-up for the 2014 Shakespeare’s Globe Book Award for his monograph, The Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries. This award, only given every other year, goes to a first monograph published in the last two years that has made a significant contribution to Shakespeare scholarship. The award was judged by a panel of prestigious academics comprising: Patrick Spottiswoode, Director Globe Education (Chair); Dr Farah Karim-Cooper (Globe Education); Professor David Lindley (University of Leeds); Professor Gordon McMullan, (King’s College London); Professor Laurie Maguire (University of Oxford); and Dr Abigail Rokison (The Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham, and Shakespeare’s Globe Book Award winner in 2012).

Now among those leaving their footprint in continuing Shakespeare scholarship is Ashgate’s very own, Kevin A Quarmby. Quarmby is Assistant Professor of English at Oxford College of Emory University, Atlanta, and Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Halle Institute for Global Learning. He is editing Henry VI Part 1 for Internet Shakespeare Editions and also holds the role of Editor for their theatre review journal, ISEC. In addition to his editorial accomplishments, Quarmby has published extensively in a variety of academic journals (Shakespeare, Shakespeare Bulletin, and Cahiers Elizabethain, to name a few). It is a considerable success then to have his first monograph attain short list status for this distinguished award.

We congratulate him on this most recent achievement and are proud to have him among our canon of authors.

The Disguised Ruler in ShakespeareThe Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries:

Measure for Measure, Malcontent and other disguised ruler plays are typically interpreted as synchronic political commentaries about King James. Quarmby, by contrast, traces the disguised ruler’s medieval origins and marks its presence on the Elizabethan stage. Influenced by European tragicomedy, the motif had by Jacobean times transformed romantic images of royal disguise into more sinister instances of politicized voyeurism. Market forces in London’s vibrant repertory system fuelled this dramatic evolution.

‘This excellent book fills a gap in the fields of English literature and history, and destabilizes some idée fixes of the Shakespeare field – for instance, the idea, often promulgated, that the Friar in Measure for Measure is a reflection of James I. Written with Quarmby’s typical charm and clarity, this important book is so cogent and accessible that scholars from undergraduates to professors will profit from it.’    Tiffany Stern, Professor of Early Modern Drama, University College, Oxford, UK

‘Kevin A. Quarmby’s The Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and His Contemporaries offers a convincing rejoinder to a new historicist orthodoxy: that the beginning of James I’s reign witnessed the emergence and brief flowering of a distinctly Jacobean subgenre, the disguised ruler play.’    Studies in English Literature 1500-1900

‘…Quarmby’s monograph is an important contribution to theatre performance criticism which will hopefully lead to a reappreciation of the disguised ruler motif among Renaissance scholars.’    Shakespeare Jahrbuch

Why are there so few women pilots?

Women pilots represent less than 6% of the worldwide pilot population and that is despite affirmative action in many countries. It is important that the aviation industry recruits more women not least because of genuine concerns about pilot shortages.

Absent AviatorsA new book, Absent Aviators, just published by Ashgate, tackles gender issues in the aviation workplace. Interestingly, the book’s introduction observes: “rather than a glass ceiling, the aviation domain appears to have glass doors. Many women may look inside and turn away from what they see and hear. Those who do enter can be faced with a strongly masculine, often misogynistic culture.”

Absent Aviators is edited by Donna Bridges, Charles Sturt University, Australia, Jane Neal-Smith, London Metropolitan Business School, and Albert J. Mills, St Mary’s University, Canada.

‘Aviation is an intensely competitive, global industry providing transportation and employment across the world. Absent Aviators is a must read for anyone with an interest in the gendered history, structure and culture of this fascinating industry. It is predicted that over 400,000 new pilots will be needed within the next two decades to meet increasing demand. Against this background, the contributors to this timely book ask, why are women so under-represented in commercial airline piloting, and what can be done to address this problem?’   Melissa Tyler, University of Essex, UK

‘Aviation buffs, sociologists of work, and feminists alike will applaud the achievements of this ample volume, detailing the man’s world of piloting. The diverse background of authors – including from within aviation – gives the volume its great texture and authority. As the cockpit remains one of the most staunchly masculinist spaces in industrial employment, Absent Aviators tackles these highly gendered realms as both a human problem and management issue.’   Christine Yano, University of Hawaii, USA

‘Absent Aviators presents a breathtaking exposure of the gendered dimensions of the historically male-dominated civil and military aviation industry. The diverse perspectives, conceptual and methodological approaches adopted by both academic and industry-based contributors provide unique insights into the barriers faced by female aviators in a variety of cases drawn from different national, historical and contemporary contexts.’   Lucy Taksa, Macquarie University, Australia

Announcing a new social policy series from Ashgate: Social Welfare Around the World

Posted by Claire Jarvis, Commissioning Editor

Our new Social Welfare Around the World series (edited by Bent Greve, Roskilde University) aims to publish high quality research monographs and edited books, focusing on development, change in provision and/or delivery of welfare – with a primary focus on developed welfare states. The books will provide overviews of themes such as pensions, social services, unemployment or housing, as well as in-depth analysis of change and impact on a micro level. The impact and influence of supranational institutions on welfare state developments will also be studied as will the methodologies used to analyse the on-going transformations of welfare states.  Publications can be diverse in approach; however the provision of new data and interpretation hereof is of central importance.

For further information about submitting a proposal please contact either the series editor Bent Greve (bgr@ruc.dk) or commissioning editor Claire Jarvis (cjarvis@ashgatepublishing.com)

About the Series Editor: Bent Greve is Professor of Welfare State Analysis at the Department of Society and Globalisation, Roskilde University, Denmark and editor and author of (amongst others): Innovation in Social Services: The Public-Private Mix in Service Provision, Fiscal Policy and Employment (Ashgate 2014); Welfare and the Welfare State: Present and Future (Routledge, 2014); Historical Dictionary of the Welfare State (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014); Evidence and Evaluation in Social Policy (Wiley-Blackwell, 2014); The Routledge Handbook of the Welfare State (Routledge 2013); and The Future of the Welfare State (Ashgate, 2006).

Argyro Loukaki’s The Geographical Unconscious – ‘absolutely fabulous’

Posted by Fiona Dunford, Marketing Executive

The Geographical Unconscious

ARGYRO LOUKAKI’s new book, The GEOGRAPHICAL UNCONSCIOUS seems absolutely fabulous. The book is not for the meek, a tour-de-force of 400-Ashage-pages, nor for the disciplinary square. It’s a collection of SNAPSHOTS that cuts through geography, art history, philosophy, and cultural studies

says Kostis Kourelis in his enthusiastic review of this recently published book, which is also commended for its innovative style.

The author uses a great visual strategy of “free sketches.” Compared to the ambitions of the whole book, this will seem rather minor, but I think it’s important. Loukaki’s free sketches are scattered through the book to make visual arguments

Dr Argyro Loukaki, author of The Geographical Unconscious is Associate Professor at the Hellenic Open University. Her book has attracted some very positive comments from other reviewers too- you can read these and access extracts from the book here

Gibson Burrell awarded the Joanne Martin Trailblazer Award 2014

Gibson Burrell, Professor at the School of Management at the University of Leicester, was presented with the Joanne Martin Trailblazer award at the recent AOM meeting in Philadelphia. The award is an accolade for exceptional career achievement, and is given by the Organization and Management Theory (OMT) Division of the Academy of Management.

From OMTweb:

“The Joanne Martin Trailblazer Award is presented once every two years. The award recognizes scholars who have taken a leadership role in the field of OMT by opening up new lines of thinking or inquiry. A Trailblazer is a boundary-spanner and a conversation starter, someone who extends and builds the OMT community by shepherding new ideas and new scholarship, often in unconventional ways. Actions that may indicate “trailblazing” behavior include starting up or moving forward a journal or scholarly series, organizing a conference or workshop, and beginning or continuing a conversation about a set of OMT ideas.

The establishment of the award was motivated by the retirement of Joanne Martin. An important part of her legacy is that she has challenged and extended the boundaries of OMT. She was a critical voice in research on culture, and she leveraged her position in an attempt to bring feminism and critical theory into the mainstream of organization theory. Professor Martin encouraged people that wouldn’t have traditionally been considered in the mainstream of organization theory to develop ideas that did not fit into existing theories and has thus broadened the membership of OMT.”

Sociological paradigms and organisational analysisGibson Burrell is Professor of Organisation Theory at Leicester and was Head of the School of Management from 2002-7. He is co-author (with Gareth Morgan) of the classic book Sociological Paradigms and Organisational Analysis.