Author Archives: ashgatepublishing

‘The Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries’ Short Listed for the Shakespeare’s Globe Book Award

Posted by Ally Berthiaume and Hattie Wilson

Congratulations to Ashgate author, Kevin A Quarmby for being awarded runner-up for the 2014 Shakespeare’s Globe Book Award for his monograph, The Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries. This award, only given every other year, goes to a first monograph published in the last two years that has made a significant contribution to Shakespeare scholarship. The award was judged by a panel of prestigious academics comprising: Patrick Spottiswoode, Director Globe Education (Chair); Dr Farah Karim-Cooper (Globe Education); Professor David Lindley (University of Leeds); Professor Gordon McMullan, (King’s College London); Professor Laurie Maguire (University of Oxford); and Dr Abigail Rokison (The Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham, and Shakespeare’s Globe Book Award winner in 2012).

Now among those leaving their footprint in continuing Shakespeare scholarship is Ashgate’s very own, Kevin A Quarmby. Quarmby is Assistant Professor of English at Oxford College of Emory University, Atlanta, and Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Halle Institute for Global Learning. He is editing Henry VI Part 1 for Internet Shakespeare Editions and also holds the role of Editor for their theatre review journal, ISEC. In addition to his editorial accomplishments, Quarmby has published extensively in a variety of academic journals (Shakespeare, Shakespeare Bulletin, and Cahiers Elizabethain, to name a few). It is a considerable success then to have his first monograph attain short list status for this distinguished award.

We congratulate him on this most recent achievement and are proud to have him among our canon of authors.

The Disguised Ruler in ShakespeareThe Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries:

Measure for Measure, Malcontent and other disguised ruler plays are typically interpreted as synchronic political commentaries about King James. Quarmby, by contrast, traces the disguised ruler’s medieval origins and marks its presence on the Elizabethan stage. Influenced by European tragicomedy, the motif had by Jacobean times transformed romantic images of royal disguise into more sinister instances of politicized voyeurism. Market forces in London’s vibrant repertory system fuelled this dramatic evolution.

‘This excellent book fills a gap in the fields of English literature and history, and destabilizes some idée fixes of the Shakespeare field – for instance, the idea, often promulgated, that the Friar in Measure for Measure is a reflection of James I. Written with Quarmby’s typical charm and clarity, this important book is so cogent and accessible that scholars from undergraduates to professors will profit from it.’    Tiffany Stern, Professor of Early Modern Drama, University College, Oxford, UK

‘Kevin A. Quarmby’s The Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and His Contemporaries offers a convincing rejoinder to a new historicist orthodoxy: that the beginning of James I’s reign witnessed the emergence and brief flowering of a distinctly Jacobean subgenre, the disguised ruler play.’    Studies in English Literature 1500-1900

‘…Quarmby’s monograph is an important contribution to theatre performance criticism which will hopefully lead to a reappreciation of the disguised ruler motif among Renaissance scholars.’    Shakespeare Jahrbuch

Why are there so few women pilots?

Women pilots represent less than 6% of the worldwide pilot population and that is despite affirmative action in many countries. It is important that the aviation industry recruits more women not least because of genuine concerns about pilot shortages.

Absent AviatorsA new book, Absent Aviators, just published by Ashgate, tackles gender issues in the aviation workplace. Interestingly, the book’s introduction observes: “rather than a glass ceiling, the aviation domain appears to have glass doors. Many women may look inside and turn away from what they see and hear. Those who do enter can be faced with a strongly masculine, often misogynistic culture.”

Absent Aviators is edited by Donna Bridges, Charles Sturt University, Australia, Jane Neal-Smith, London Metropolitan Business School, and Albert J. Mills, St Mary’s University, Canada.

‘Aviation is an intensely competitive, global industry providing transportation and employment across the world. Absent Aviators is a must read for anyone with an interest in the gendered history, structure and culture of this fascinating industry. It is predicted that over 400,000 new pilots will be needed within the next two decades to meet increasing demand. Against this background, the contributors to this timely book ask, why are women so under-represented in commercial airline piloting, and what can be done to address this problem?’   Melissa Tyler, University of Essex, UK

‘Aviation buffs, sociologists of work, and feminists alike will applaud the achievements of this ample volume, detailing the man’s world of piloting. The diverse background of authors – including from within aviation – gives the volume its great texture and authority. As the cockpit remains one of the most staunchly masculinist spaces in industrial employment, Absent Aviators tackles these highly gendered realms as both a human problem and management issue.’   Christine Yano, University of Hawaii, USA

‘Absent Aviators presents a breathtaking exposure of the gendered dimensions of the historically male-dominated civil and military aviation industry. The diverse perspectives, conceptual and methodological approaches adopted by both academic and industry-based contributors provide unique insights into the barriers faced by female aviators in a variety of cases drawn from different national, historical and contemporary contexts.’   Lucy Taksa, Macquarie University, Australia

Announcing a new social policy series from Ashgate: Social Welfare Around the World

Posted by Claire Jarvis, Commissioning Editor

Our new Social Welfare Around the World series (edited by Bent Greve, Roskilde University) aims to publish high quality research monographs and edited books, focusing on development, change in provision and/or delivery of welfare – with a primary focus on developed welfare states. The books will provide overviews of themes such as pensions, social services, unemployment or housing, as well as in-depth analysis of change and impact on a micro level. The impact and influence of supranational institutions on welfare state developments will also be studied as will the methodologies used to analyse the on-going transformations of welfare states.  Publications can be diverse in approach; however the provision of new data and interpretation hereof is of central importance.

For further information about submitting a proposal please contact either the series editor Bent Greve (bgr@ruc.dk) or commissioning editor Claire Jarvis (cjarvis@ashgatepublishing.com)

About the Series Editor: Bent Greve is Professor of Welfare State Analysis at the Department of Society and Globalisation, Roskilde University, Denmark and editor and author of (amongst others): Innovation in Social Services: The Public-Private Mix in Service Provision, Fiscal Policy and Employment (Ashgate 2014); Welfare and the Welfare State: Present and Future (Routledge, 2014); Historical Dictionary of the Welfare State (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014); Evidence and Evaluation in Social Policy (Wiley-Blackwell, 2014); The Routledge Handbook of the Welfare State (Routledge 2013); and The Future of the Welfare State (Ashgate, 2006).

Argyro Loukaki’s The Geographical Unconscious – ‘absolutely fabulous’

Posted by Fiona Dunford, Marketing Executive

The Geographical Unconscious

ARGYRO LOUKAKI’s new book, The GEOGRAPHICAL UNCONSCIOUS seems absolutely fabulous. The book is not for the meek, a tour-de-force of 400-Ashage-pages, nor for the disciplinary square. It’s a collection of SNAPSHOTS that cuts through geography, art history, philosophy, and cultural studies

says Kostis Kourelis in his enthusiastic review of this recently published book, which is also commended for its innovative style.

The author uses a great visual strategy of “free sketches.” Compared to the ambitions of the whole book, this will seem rather minor, but I think it’s important. Loukaki’s free sketches are scattered through the book to make visual arguments

Dr Argyro Loukaki, author of The Geographical Unconscious is Associate Professor at the Hellenic Open University. Her book has attracted some very positive comments from other reviewers too- you can read these and access extracts from the book here

Gibson Burrell awarded the Joanne Martin Trailblazer Award 2014

Gibson Burrell, Professor at the School of Management at the University of Leicester, was presented with the Joanne Martin Trailblazer award at the recent AOM meeting in Philadelphia. The award is an accolade for exceptional career achievement, and is given by the Organization and Management Theory (OMT) Division of the Academy of Management.

From OMTweb:

“The Joanne Martin Trailblazer Award is presented once every two years. The award recognizes scholars who have taken a leadership role in the field of OMT by opening up new lines of thinking or inquiry. A Trailblazer is a boundary-spanner and a conversation starter, someone who extends and builds the OMT community by shepherding new ideas and new scholarship, often in unconventional ways. Actions that may indicate “trailblazing” behavior include starting up or moving forward a journal or scholarly series, organizing a conference or workshop, and beginning or continuing a conversation about a set of OMT ideas.

The establishment of the award was motivated by the retirement of Joanne Martin. An important part of her legacy is that she has challenged and extended the boundaries of OMT. She was a critical voice in research on culture, and she leveraged her position in an attempt to bring feminism and critical theory into the mainstream of organization theory. Professor Martin encouraged people that wouldn’t have traditionally been considered in the mainstream of organization theory to develop ideas that did not fit into existing theories and has thus broadened the membership of OMT.”

Sociological paradigms and organisational analysisGibson Burrell is Professor of Organisation Theory at Leicester and was Head of the School of Management from 2002-7. He is co-author (with Gareth Morgan) of the classic book Sociological Paradigms and Organisational Analysis.

Completely revised and updated second edition of the BIALL Handbook of Legal Information Management is now available

Posted by Helen Moore, Marketing Manager

BIALL handbook of legal information managementA new edition of The BIALL Handbook of Legal Information Management, which was first published seven years ago, was published last month by the British & Irish Association of Law Librarians (BIALL) and Ashgate. Edited by Loyita Worley and Sarah Spells, this is a valuable handbook and important reference tool for managers and staff of all types of legal information services.

The new edition has been thoroughly updated by the original team of experts and new contributors, to provide best practice guidance on the key legal information issues for every type of service. Each of the chapters has been updated to reflect general changes in law libraries in the past seven years. The Handbook covers new information technologies, including social networking and communication. New chapters also focus on the key topics of outsourcing and the impact of the Legal Services Act 2007.

“This second edition brings the Handbook right up to date which ensures that this essential reference work continues to be an extremely valuable resource for anyone interested in the field of legal information services across all sectors of employment.  The publication of this new edition is due in large part to Loyita Worley of Reed Smith LLP.  Loyita took up the task of editing following the untimely death of Sarah Spells, Law Librarian and Deputy Head of Teaching and Research Support at SOAS Library, who passed away before the work on the new edition was complete.”   Marianne Barber, current BIALL President

Contents:  Foreword, Jas Breslin; Preface; Law libraries and their users, Jules Winterton; Sources of legal information and their organization, Guy Holborn; Legal research – techniques and tips, Peter Clinch; Legal technologies: Current awareness systems, Dean Mason; Law firm intranets, Sally Roberts; Library management systems (LMS), Mandy Webster; Financial management: Planning and budgeting, Sarah Brittan and Michael Maher; Negotiating online subscriptions, Fiona Fogden; Managing legal information professionals, Loyita Worley and Jacky Berry; Copyright and data protection, Chris Holland; Knowledge management, Ann Hemming; Collection management: Cataloguing and classification, Diana Morris; Developing the collection and managing the space, Lesley Young; Taxonomies and indexing, Christine Miskin; E-learning and virtual learning environments, Angela Donaldson; Planning a training session, Emily Allbon; Making the most of social media tools, James Mullan; Outsourcing, Kate Stanfield and Sophie Thompson; The Legal Services Act, Amanda McKenzie; Case studies: Academic law libraries, Diane Raper; Freelance legal information professionals, Karen Scott; Government department libraries, Penny Scott, Stephanie Curran, Kathy Turner and Rachel Robbins; Law firm libraries and information services, Loyita Worley; Solo librarians, Nicola Herbert; Professional society libraries: the Northern Ireland experience of change and repositioning, Heather Semple; References and Bibliography; Index.

About the EditorsLoyita Worley has been Senior Manager of EMEA Library Operations at Reed Smith LLP since January 2007 following the merger of Reed Smith and Richards Butler and has recently been promoted to Director. She was Chair of the British and Irish Association of Law Librarians (BIALL) in 1997-1998 and has been involved with BIALL in many capacities since and is currently on the Legal Information Management Editorial Board. She is also a member of the Special Libraries Association (SLA).

Sarah Spells was the Law Librarian and Deputy Head of Teaching and Research Support at SOAS Library, UK.

For more information on the book, please visit: http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781409423966

How did Victorian Scots reconcile an independent history with a unionist present? A guest post from Richard Marsden

richard marsdenThis is a guest post from Richard Marsden, author of Cosmo Innes and the Defence of Scotland’s Past c.1825-1875

With the independence referendum looming, Scotland’s history has become a battleground. Those against separation point to three hundred years of supposed shared culture and values. Those for it point to what they see as a proud independent history stretching back far longer.

Yet the independence movement in Scotland is of relatively recent origin. Up until the 1930s the goal of most Scottish nationalists was home-rule (itself a form of devolution) rather than the abolition of the 1707 union. Indeed in the nineteenth century, union with England went unquestioned by most educated Scots. Such a seemingly uncritical endorsement of union seems puzzling to twenty-first century eyes. It certainly raises questions about how the Scots in this period saw themselves and their place in the United Kingdom.

One of the best ways of answering these questions is to look at how Victorian Scots reconciled an independent history with a unionist present. After all, depictions of the past can often reveal as much about the times in which they were written as they do about the times to which they refer.

Cosmo Innes and the defence of Scotlands pastThis precept is the starting point for my new book: Cosmo Innes and the Defence of Scotland’s Past c.1825-1875. This study uses the work of the influential antiquary Cosmo Innes (1798-1874) to open a window onto Scottish attitudes towards the ‘national past’ in the nineteenth century. What it reveals is not a straight-forward contest between union and independence, but rather a series of debates about Scotland’s relationship with and position within the union.

Interpretations of the past were central to those discussions. Scottish identity in this period rested on legal, educational and religious institutions that were distinct from those of England, as well as less tangible considerations such as landscape, architecture, descent, and national character. As a result, historical scholarship was framed by questions about the extent to which the development of these elements in the past had contributed to Scotland’s happy state in what was, for Innes and his compatriots, the present.

Innes saw much of value in Scotland’s pre-1707 history. In his view, Scottish institutions were singularly suited to Scottish national character because both had been forged through the same shared historical experience. For Innes, like many of his countrymen, past independence and present-day union were not at odds. Instead, it was that very history which enabled the country to stand in equal partnership with England in a way that Wales and Ireland could not.

Such attitudes are particularly telling given that the intellectuals of the Enlightenment had bequeathed to their nineteenth-century successors a profoundly negative view of the Scottish past. To them, it was union with England rather than any internal processes of historical progress that had dragged Scotland into the modern civilised age. A sizable proportion of Innes’s peers shared that view. They were consequently unconvinced by his attempts to reinvigorate Scotland’s sense of its own historically-based identity.

Innes’s views were thus a radical departure from those of the previous generation. Yet he also remained utterly committed to union, believing that Scotland’s well-being rested upon a close association with England as well as on the nation’s own unique history prior to 1707. Indeed like many of his fellows he believed that the lowland Scots were of the same Saxon stock as the English, and had little in common with the Celts of the Highlands. Innes’s work on Scottish history was therefore imbued with a desire to restore the union rather than break it; to return to the alliance of equals which, he believed, it had originally been.

So how does all this relate to the referendum debate today?

On the one hand we might argue that the roots of Scottish nationalism can be traced deep into the nineteenth century, despite the fact that this period was characterised by a near universal commitment to union. On occasion, Innes certainly employed stirring language that would not look out of place in a present-day political pamphlet. Yet on the other, we could point out that Scottish national identity does not always go hand in hand with aspirations to statehood. In a cultural sense it was alive and well at a time when political separatism would have been the perceived as purview of cranks and extremists.

Whichever way we look at it, the fact remains that Scotland’s past continues to be contested territory in arguments about the nation’s future. That is as true in the twenty-first century as it was in the nineteenth.