Category Archives: Art and Visual Studies

Book launch at the Frick Collection for British Models of Art Collecting and the American Response

Posted by Luana Life, Marketing Executive

Join Inge Reist, editor of British Models of Art Collecting and the American Response: Reflections Across the Pond for a book launch at The Frick Collection (1 East 70th Street, NYC), Wednesday, December 17 at 4.30pm. She will present a brief overview of the book, and will be joined by Ashgate series editor Michael Yonin, who will discuss The Histories of Material Culture and Collecting, 1700–1950.  Signed copies will be available for purchase.

British models of art collecting and the american responseThis collection of fourteen essays by distinguished art and cultural historians examine points of similarity and difference in British and American art collecting. Half the essays examine the trends that dominated the British art collecting scene of the nineteenth century. Others focus on American collectors, using biographical sketches and case studies to demonstrate how collectors in the United States embellished the British model to develop their own, often philanthropic approach to art collecting.

Learn more about British Models of Art Collecting and the American Response

100th volume published in the Women and Gender in the Early Modern World Series

Posted by Hattie Wilson, Marketing Executive

Autobiographical writing by early modern hispanic womenAshgate will publish the one hundredth title in the Women and Gender in the Early Modern World Series in January 2015. The series editors, Allyson Poska and Abby Zanger produced their first volume in 2000 (Maternal Measures, Naomi J. Miller and Naomi Yavneh). Fifteen years later, we can announce the one hundredth title is Autobiographical Writing by Early Modern Hispanic Women by Elizabeth Teresa Howe. The work focuses on the contributions of women writers to the study of life writing, and offers a symmetrical theme to the initial volume in the series.

We would like to offer our sincere congratulations to Allyson Poska and Abby Zanger, as well as thanking them for their dedication to their role. To view the Women and Gender in the Early Modern World Series in its entirety, and to read an interview with the series editors, please click here.

Forthcoming titles in the series:

 

Between apes and angels, animals and Ashgate: authors to attend animal studies conference at University of Edinburgh

Posted by Ally Berthiaume, Editorial Assistant

Animal Studies is a trending topic in academe with an increased production of literature across the disciplines. Ashgate is positioned within this rising canon, having contributed at least twenty titles to this growing body of animal-studies scholarship. Among these is Ashgate’s newly published collection, Animals and Early Modern Identity, edited by Pia F. Cuneo.Animals and early modern identity

Animals and Early Modern Identity spans the globe, including works from scholars in the United States, Europe and Africa. Apart from the range of the contributors’ geographical locations, there is also great diversity among the animal species appearing within these essays – from horses, dogs, and pigs to rhinoceroses, sea monsters, and other creatures. As Cuneo succinctly puts it in her introduction:

The wide array of disciplines, geographies, and species represented in the volume speaks to the vigor of intellectual inquiry into the subject of animal and nonhuman animal interaction in the early modern period (1400–1700).

Holding it all together, she asserts, is the issue of identity. This collection investigates what kinds of identities were developed by the interaction between human and animal; how these were expressed, for what reason, and with who were they shared. Each essay centers on the ways in which humans use animals to say something about themselves.

The expansion of ‘animal studies’ as a field, and the extent of the range of inquiry contained within it, is evidenced not only by the number and variety of academic publications, but also by a proliferation of conference panels – and sometimes whole conferences –  dedicated to the theme.  The past year or so has seen a number of these, crossing multiple disciplines and time periods, culminating this week with:  Animals and Critical Heritage and Between Apes & Angels: Human and Animal in the Early Modern World.

The latter conference features several contributing authors to Animals and Early Modern Identity as speakers, thus underlining the timeliness and significance of the volume.

Pia F. Cuneo is Professor of Art History at the University of Arizona, USA.  Her current work focuses on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century hippology, and she competes locally in dressage.

To see other Animal Studies titles click here.

The Antonio II Badile Album of Drawings – ‘an exceptionally interesting and meticulous book’

Posted by Beth Whalley, Marketing Executive

The Antonio Il Badile Album of Drawings‘This is an exceptionally interesting and meticulous book, whose supreme merit is to cast light on a hitherto distinctly overlooked but utterly absorbing corner of the admittedly seemingly endless artistic landscape of the Italian Renaissance.’

So writes world-renowned authority on Italian Renaissance painting Professor David Ekserdjian in November’s issue of The Art Newspaper, on Evelyn Karet’s The Antonio II Badile Album of Drawings: The Origins of Collecting Drawings in Early Modern Northern Italy.

The book makes a major contribution to the study of North Italian drawings, a field that has been relatively neglected when compared with Tuscan drawings of the Renaissance. The album in question is the earliest known example of an art collection pasted onto the pages of a book, and Karet traces its long history, from its assemblage in the late 1530s to its dismantling in the 1950s by dealer Francis Matthiesen. Matthiesen photographed the album in its entirety before taking it apart, meaning that Karet is able to discuss what the album originally looked like and draw conclusions about its organisation. The volume is supplemented by appendices providing a reconstruction of the original album and a page-by-page guide to its contents.

Karet uses the album as a new point of reference for the collecting of drawings in northern Italy in the early modern era before Vasari. She discusses the Badile family, the contact between artists and humanists, and the hitherto little-acknowledged role of Verona as an exceptionally early centre of collection in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Evelyn Karet holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and is a Scholar in Residence in the Department of Visual and Performing Arts at Clark University, USA where she was previously Associate Professor and taught Renaissance Art History. A scholar of late Gothic and Renaissance art, she has also taught at Boston College, Wheaton College, and the University of Georgia Studies Abroad Program in Italy.

New series: Image, Text and Culture in Classical Antiquity – Call for proposals

We are currently seeking book proposals for a new series Image, Text and Culture in Classical Antiquity edited by Michael Squire, King’s College, London

Since the Renaissance – and arguably much earlier – European culture has looked to the Classical world for inspiration and enlightenment, and measured its own achievements by the standards of the classical world.

In order to better comprehend this culture, both on its own terms and in light of subsequent generations, this new series provides an innovative and interdisciplinary forum for original research into the arts, literature and cultural history of the Classical World. Attuned to the ways in which different cultural forms mediate different understandings of the Classical past, the series explores both the problems and opportunities of reconstructing classical culture from its surviving archaeological and literary traces. By crossing traditional disciplinary and subdisciplinary boundaries within and beyond the field of Classics, and drawing on approaches developed outside its historicist parameters, the series engages a broad readership from a range of academic perspectives.

As the series title suggests, one defining interest is the intersection (no less than divergence) between Classical visual and verbal media. In what ways do images and texts construct different records of the past, and how did ancient artists and writers themselves theorise the relations between the readable and the visible? Drawing on recent comparative literary and visual cultural studies, the series explores how interdisciplinary approaches can illuminate different aspects of ancient cultural and intellectual history, whilst also showing how Classical materials can in turn nuance more modern theories of visual and verbal mediation.

The Classical world offers a unique opportunity for such study, not only due to its influence on subsequent western literary and artistic traditions, but also because its art is matched only by the sophistication of contemporary written and inscribed texts (and vice versa). The simultaneously collaborating and competing relationships between different media raise broader questions about both historical method and the history of western reading and seeing.

Publishing monographs concerned with all periods of Classical and Graeco-Roman history, from Archaic Greece all the way through to late antiquity, the series is particularly interested in projects structured according to theme, medium or methodological problem rather than chronological timeframe. By studying relations between different media, it offers new historical perspectives on the cultural contexts that gave rise to them; probing, interrogating and provoking scholarship across a wide range of academic disciplines.

For more information on how to submit a book proposal to the series, please contact Tom Gray, at tgray@ashgatepublishing.com.

Series Advisory Board:

Professor Jas’ Elsner, University of Oxford / University of Chicago

Professor Jonas Grethlein, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, Heidelberg

Professor François Lissarrague, l’École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris

Professor Katharina Lorenz, University of Nottingham

Professor Clemente Marconi, New York University

Professor Susanne Muth, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Professor Richard Neer, University of Chicago

Professor Verity Platt, Cornell University

Dr Jeremy Tanner, University College London

Professor Jennifer Trimble, Stanford

Professor Tim Whitmarsh, University of Oxford

Professor Froma Zeitlin, University of Princeton

Sharon Gregory’s ‘Vasari and the Renaissance Print’ highly commended by the 2014 SRS book prize judges

Vasari and the Renaissance PrintWe’re delighted to learn that Sharon Gregory’s book Vasari and the Renaissance Print was highly commended by the 2014 Society for Renaissance Studies book prize judges.

From the SRS website:

The 2014 SRS book prize was awarded to Alec Ryrie for his book, Being Protestant in Reformation Britain (OUP, 2013). Two other books were highly commended, Guido Alfani, Calamities and the Economy in Renaissance Italy: The Grand Tour of the Horsemen of the Apocalypse, trans. Christine Calvert (Palgrave, 2013), and Sharon Gregory, Vasari and the Renaissance Print (Ashgate, 2012).

The judges were impressed by the high standard of the books entered for the prize and were extremely grateful to all the many publishers who sent in their books to the committee making the decision of choosing a winner extremely difficult.

Professor Gregory’s book was singled out by all three judges because of its comprehensive nature and painstaking research in making available for a wide readership all the prints associated with Giorgio Vasari, and for providing a fascinating commentary that explains why they were so central to his thinking and artistic practices. The book is the product of many years of serious scholarship and is exactly the sort of work that justifies what academics do in opening up the archive for others to understand and use and which makes being part of the profession a pleasure. The committee also wishes to congratulate the publishers for producing such high quality images.

Read the full announcement here

About the Author:  Sharon Gregory is Associate Professor in Art History and Erasmus Chair in Renaissance Humanism at St Francis Xavier University, Canada.

As well as being highly Commended for the SRS Book Prize, Vasari and the Renaissance Print also received honorable Mention for the IFPDA Book Award, 2013, and was designated as a US Core Title for 2012 by Yankee Book Peddler.

‘… an exemplary piece of scholarship, deeply considered and scrupulously documented, that will be of interest to curators and historians and literary scholars alike. The first focus here concerns the many uses Vasari made of the prints both for his own artistic production and then for the accounts of those artists included in his text The Lives whose work he knew from evidence such as this. But Gregory also lays out here a fascinating and carefully grounded account of the dissemination of visual materials in this first moment of printing and the ways prints could become a vital part of the larger culture. It is rare to find a study on these subjects that is so sure of its details yet manages also to move beyond them to offer original insights and conclusions.’   David Cast, Bryn Mawr College; author of The Delight of Art: Giorgio Vasari and the Traditions of Humanist Discourse

‘This well-researched and well-structured book examines a number of different aspects of its subject… This very welcome book opens up many perspectives beyond its immediate subject.’ The Burlington Magazine

‘… an ordinary reader with a passing knowledge of Italian Renaissance art will find much of interest in this new book… these essays form a clear, well-sourced analysis of the role of prints in the Renaissance artist’s studio.’   The Art Newspaper

‘This clearly written, well-researched, and intelligently structured book will remain a fundamental point of reference for all those interested in the history of printmaking as well as in Vasari’s fundamental contribution to art history.’   Renaissance Quarterly

‘[Gregory’s] very wide-ranging and clearly written text is a valuable source of evidence and ideas for anyone interested in theVite, or for the use of prints in Renaissance workshops.’   Print Quarterly

‘Throughout Vasari and the Renaissance Print the author displays an admirable depth of knowledge with fascinating statistics, such as … the history of prints, Vasari, Florentine history, and print culture in early modern Europe.’   Sixteenth Century Studies Journal

Full information about Vasari and the Renaissance Print

Lund Humphries, in association with Apollo, launches Emerging Art Writers Competition

Ashgate’s sister imprint, Art-book publisher Lund Humphries, is launching a competition in association with Apollo, the International Art Magazine, to find previously unpublished writers who are able to write seriously yet accessibly about art.

Part of Lund Humphries’ year-long 75th birthday celebrations, the Emerging Art Writers competition provides an opportunity for aspiring art writers to showcase their work to movers and shakers from the British art world. The judging panel comprises Lucy Myers, Managing Director of Lund Humphries; Simon Martin, Artistic Director of Pallant House Gallery in Chichester; Ian McKeever RA, acclaimed British painter and printmaker; and Thomas Marks, Editor of Apollo.

Lucy Myers explains: ‘Lund Humphries has a long reputation for producing beautiful art books with serious, well-researched and original texts which are relevant to both specialists and enthusiasts. We support writing which is analytical and thought-provoking, but free of critical theory. I very much hope that some fresh, interesting new voices will emerge through our competition.’

A similar sentiment is expressed by Thomas Marks, Editor of Apollo, who says, ‘Scholarly but accessible; intellectual but stylish; this is exactly the type of writing I’m trying to encourage in Apollo – so I’m very sympathetic to the ethos of the competition.’

Entrants are asked to produce an essay of between 1,500 and 2,500 words which answers the question: What, if anything, is the legacy of British Modernism in British art today? For more information, including full terms and conditions, potential entrants are invited to visit www.lundhumphries.com/emergingartwriters

The deadline for entries is 5 pm on 1 September 2014 and the winner will be announced on 26 November 2014, at Lund Humphries’ flagship 75th birthday event at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London. The winner will receive two VIP tickets to the ICA event, and Apollo plan to publish the winning essay in the January 2015 issue of the magazine. The winner will also win £75 worth of Lund Humphries art books and have the opportunity to meet with a member of the Lund Humphries commissioning team to discuss future book projects.