Category Archives: Authors

Book launch at the Frick Collection for British Models of Art Collecting and the American Response

Posted by Luana Life, Marketing Executive

Join Inge Reist, editor of British Models of Art Collecting and the American Response: Reflections Across the Pond for a book launch at The Frick Collection (1 East 70th Street, NYC), Wednesday, December 17 at 4.30pm. She will present a brief overview of the book, and will be joined by Ashgate series editor Michael Yonin, who will discuss The Histories of Material Culture and Collecting, 1700–1950.  Signed copies will be available for purchase.

British models of art collecting and the american responseThis collection of fourteen essays by distinguished art and cultural historians examine points of similarity and difference in British and American art collecting. Half the essays examine the trends that dominated the British art collecting scene of the nineteenth century. Others focus on American collectors, using biographical sketches and case studies to demonstrate how collectors in the United States embellished the British model to develop their own, often philanthropic approach to art collecting.

Learn more about British Models of Art Collecting and the American Response

Remembering the Cultural Geographies of a Childhood Home

Posted by Fiona Dunford, Marketing Executive

Remembering the cultural geographies of a childhood homeRemembering the Cultural Geographies of a Childhood Home

‘A kaleidoscopic view of the 1970s in which the places, experiences, beliefs and reveries of a childhood in South Wales and the books, comics, television programmes, films and popular pursuits of the period constantly shift to create new and provocative perceptions of the cultural fabric and transformations of that difficult decade’   Mike Pearson, Aberystwyth University, UK

Peter Hughes Jachimiak,  author of  Remembering the Cultural Geographies of a Childhood Home talks about his own upbringing and early influences in a recent interview with the Daily Wales.

The book is, “about how all of us remember our childhood selves, and how we, as children, engage with the places and spaces of childhood. That is, our home, the immediate neighbourhood outside, the wider world beyond, and how both media and cultural texts of the time reflect all of that.” Peter’s childhood home was Ivy Cottage, Skewen, in the Neath of the 1970s and the book is fundamentally autobiographical: ‘‘Me, as an adult and a father, and my bringing up of our lovely little daughter, Mille, aged 4. For I wrote my book as I watched her grow from a baby to a toddler, to that of being a beautiful little girl. And, that’s a wonderful thing – to be able to write about one’s own childhood as you bring someone into this world.’’   The Daily Wales

To read the full interview including the author describing his political roots and passion for music follow the link here

The author, Peter Hughes Jachimiak, who is senior lecturer in Media & Cultural Studies at the Faculty of Creative Industries, University of South Wales has also produced a very entertaining podcast in which many of the themes and issues addressed in his book are explored. You can follow the link here

Call for proposals – ICLARS Series on Law and Religion

Posted by Sarah Stilwell, Senior Marketing Executive

Call for proposals – ICLARS Series on Law and Religion

Series Editors: Professor Silvio Ferrari, University of Milan, Italy, (series coordinator); Dr Russell Sandberg, Cardiff University, UK, (series managing editor); Professor Pieter Coertzen, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa; Professor W. Cole Durham, Jr., Brigham Young University, USA; Professor Tahir Mahmood, Amity International University, India

The ICLARS Series on Law and Religion is a new series designed to provide a forum for the rapidly expanding field of research in law and religion. The series is published in association with the International Consortium for Law and Religion Studies, an international network of scholars and experts of law and religion founded in 2007 with the aim of providing a place where information, data and opinions can easily be exchanged among members and made available to the broader scientific community. The series aims to become a primary source for students and scholars while presenting authors with a valuable means to reach a wide and growing readership.

The first titles published in this series will be:

  • Religion and Equality: Law in Conflict
  • Church and State in Scotland: Developing Law
  • Religions and Constitutional Transitions in the Muslim Mediterranean
  • Proportionality, Equality Laws and Religion

The series editors are currently welcoming proposals for this new book series on any matter falling under ‘law and religion’ widely defined. Collections arising from important conferences and events are welcome as well as monographs by both established names and new voices (including monographs based on doctoral dissertations). Also of interest are interdisciplinary works and studies of particular jurisdictions.

To submit a book proposal for the series please email Dr Russell Sandberg: SandbergR@cf.ac.uk. For more information on how to submit a book proposal please contact the publisher Alison Kirk: akirk@ashgatepublishing.com.

More information about ICLARS can be found on the website: http://www.iclars.org/

“Just the right amount of provocation for readers” – Demolishing Whitehall commended in the RIBA President’s Award for Research 2014

Posted by Fiona Dunford, Marketing Executive

Ashgate are pleased to announce that Adam Sharr and Stephen Thornton, authors of Demolishing Whitehall: Leslie Martin, Harold Wilson and the Architecture of White Heat were recently shortlisted for this prestigious award in recognition of their outstanding university-located research. The RIBA President’s Award for Research acknowledges and encourages fresh and strategic thinking in architectural research for the benefit of the profession as a whole.

‘The judges applauded this outstanding work for tackling an often overlooked area. In covering various points of view, including design and politics, the judges considered the research to be a good polemic with just the right amount of provocation for readers. The author’s passion made the work all the more interesting.’   RIBA Judging Panel

Demolishing WhitehallDemolishing Whitehall tells the story of a grand 1960s plan to demolish most of Whitehall, London’s historic government district, and replace it with a ziggurat-section megastructure built in concrete. The book has been well-received  by reviewers and praised for its originality in the recounting of this largely forgotten episode in post-war history.

‘What an amazing saga. Officially commissioned early in 1964 to produce what would now be described as a ‘masterplan’ for the government quarter, the Whitehall area of London. …The story deserves to be known and is well told by Adam Sharr and Stephen Thornton.’    Architectural Review

‘What might have been a dry, academic investigation into a government planning exercise is instead imbued with wit, charm and novel insight.’    Architecture Today

Adam Sharr is Professor of Architecture at the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at Newcastle University, UK and editor of the journal Architectural Research Quarterly and Stephen Thornton is Senior Lecturer in Politics at the School of European Languages, Translation and Politics at Cardiff University, UK.

Congratulations to Catherine Burke, winner of the Anne Bloomfield Book Prize

Posted by Fiona Dunford, Marketing Executive

A life in education and architectureAshgate are delighted to announce that A Life in Education and Architecture: Mary Beaumont Medd has received the Anne Bloomfield Book Prize:  an award given by The History of Education Society recognising this work as the best book on the history of education published between 2010-13. Catherine Burke recently received her award at the Society’s annual conference in Dublin, details of which can be found on their Blog.

Enthusiastic praise for A Life in Education has come from many quarters

‘This is a generous, well-crafted review of the life of Bradford-born public sector architect Mary Medd (née Crowley, 1907-2005). As a means of gaining insight into how to design schools, Catherine Burke’s book beautifully illuminates her subject’s profound impact on the thinking and processes involved… Burke, a historian of education, shows mastery of her subject here and delivers it through a light, accessible style.’   Times Higher Education

‘…this splendid volume, engagingly written and lavishly supplied with over 100 illustrations, is the most interesting, informative and inspirational book on the history of education that I have read in 2013′   Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education

Catherine Burke is an historian and senior lecturer in education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. She has researched Mary Medd’s life and travels since the architect’s death in 2005, while at the same time engaging with architects designing schools today to bring about a better understanding of the history of the subject. Other related publications include The School I’d Like (2003) and School (2008) both with Ian Grosvenor.

Ashgate authors Iain J. M. Robertson and Richard A. Marsden shortlisted for the Saltire Society Literary Awards

Posted by Beth Whalley, Marketing Executive

Ashgate authors Iain J. M. Robertson and Richard A. Marsden were among those honoured at Scotland’s prestigious Saltire Society Literary Awards on Tuesday, 11th November 2014. Robertson and Marsden were shortlisted for the Research Book of the Year Award and History Book of the Year Award respectively, in the company of acclaimed academics and famed fiction writers, all of whom reside in Scotland, are of Scottish descent, or take a Scottish figure, historical event, or issue as their subject.

In a true celebration of Scottish literary talent, the Awards ceremony took place at Dynamic Earth, an iconic visitor attraction set at the heart of Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site, and was supported by the British Council Scotland, Waterstones, the Scottish Historical Review and the National Library of Scotland, amongst others.

Cosmo Innes and the defence of Scotlands pastBoth authors enrich our understandings of crucial moments in Scotland’s history. Marsden considers the work of the influential antiquarian Cosmo Innes (1798-1874) to answer the question of how Victorian Scots reconciled an independent history with a unionist present. Innes, a prolific editor of medieval and early modern documents relating to Scotland’s parliament, universities and church, operated within an elite network, had access to the leading intellectuals and politicians of the day, and had significant influence on a contemporary understanding of Scottish history. Marsden’s ‘masterly scholarly monograph’ (Stefan Berger, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Germany) therefore provides a window onto the ways in which the Scots viewed their own ‘national past.’ You can read more about Cosmo Innes, and its relationship with Scotland’s contested identity in the 21st century, here.

Lanscapes of Protest in the Scottish HighlandsRobertson’s ‘critical landmark in protest history’ (Carl Griffin, University of Sussex, UK) draws on oral testimony and individual case studies to provide a lens through which to explore the fluid and contingent nature of protest performances. He turns to the Scottish Highlands in November 1918. Agrarian change threatened a wave of unemployment and eviction for the land-working population, and those who had served during the First World War found themselves returning to social and economic conditions that should have been left behind. Widespread social protest rapidly followed. Robertson navigates these events in order to illustrate how a range of forms of protest demanded attention (unlike the earlier Land Wars period, these protests were successful) and illustrate the formative role of landscape in people’s lifespaces.

We’d like to extend our congratulations to Richard, Iain, and all the other winners and shortlisted authors honoured at the awards.

Richard A. Marsden works for Cardiff University where he teaches History and coordinates a foundation pathway enabling adults without formal qualifications to progress onto degrees in the historical disciplines. More information about Cosmo Innes and the Defence of Scotland’s Past c. 1825-1875

Iain J. M. Robertson is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Gloucestershire. More information about Landscapes of Protest in the Scottish Highlands after 1914: The Later Highland Land Wars

New series: Sexualities in Society, edited by Helen Hester – call for proposals

Posted by Claire Jarvis, Senior Commissioning Editor

Ashgate Publishing is delighted to announce the launch of a new series: Sexualities in Society. Edited by Helen Hester (Lecturer in Promotional Cultures at Middlesex University, UK and author of Beyond Explicit: Pornography and the Displacement of Sex (SUNY Press, 2014) and co-editor of Fat Sex (Ashgate, 2015), it will offer a dedicated and much-needed space for the very best in interdisciplinary research on sex, sexualities, and twenty-first century society.

Its contemporary focus, methodological inclusivity, and international scope will provide a distinctive vantage point in terms of surveying the social organization of sexuality. It critically addresses numerous aspects of sex and sexuality, from media representations, to embodied sexual practices, to the sometimes controversial issues surrounding consent, sexual fantasy, and identity politics. It represents a critically rigorous, theoretically informed, and genuinely interdisciplinary attempt to interrogate a complex nexus of ideas regarding the ways in which sexualities inform, and are informed by, the broader sociopolitical contexts in which they emerge.

For further information about the series, including details of how to submit a proposal, please email Senior Commissioning Editor for Sociology Claire Jarvis (cjarvis@ashgatepublishing.com).