Category Archives: Authors

Alice’s Adventures in Brewing Land – a guest post from Zoe Jaques and Eugene Giddens

Posted by Beth Whalley, Marketing Executive

Zoe Jaques and Eugene Giddens are co-authors of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass: A Publishing History.

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Research towards the book led us to seek reappropriations of Alice in the UK and abroad, especially the US and Japan. We took a particular interest in Carroll’s effect on culinary history. The real-life Charles Dodgson was fastidious about his diet, and his books reflect a similar obsession with consumption.[1] As we discuss in chapter two, Carroll was shocked that the Looking-Glass biscuit tins he had informally licenced were being sold with biscuits inside, and he insisted that his share of the tins be delivered empty.

Modern culinary responses to Alice, some no doubt that would perplex Carroll, are discussed in the fifth chapter of our book.

Dish from the Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Restaurant in Ginza, Tokyo

Dish from the Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Restaurant in Ginza, Tokyo

Space constraints meant that we could not pursue our food-related research, in writing at least, as fully as we wished, but we did gather material on recipes ranging from Victorian mock-turtle soup to Heston Blumenthal’s Alice banquet. We also encountered a number of Wonderland-themed alcoholic drinks being brewed around the world. Alice in modern times is strongly linked to cultures of intoxication. [2] Guinness, for instance, frequently used Alice in its marketing campaigns, and the British Library currently sells a ‘Drink Me’ sparkling wine.

Beer-makers have also taken up this association through a variety of Alice-inspired brews. Arguably the ‘drink me’ flavours of ‘cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast’ are best found in malt and hops, perhaps in a red Rodenbach or a vintage J. W. Lees Harvest Ale. In the hopes of discovering some of these flavours, we have opened three beers with an Alice connection

Alice beers and books

Alice beers and books

Mad Hatter Down the Rabbit Hole – 8.1%

The cherry tart is certainly present in this sour beer. It’s fizzy and lemony with tropical fruit and elements of pine, biscuit, flowers, and grapefruit. Plenty of hoppy complexity.

Humpty Dumpty Bad Egg – 4.1%

A ruby ale with plums and hints of banana, packed with berries. A light, malty beer that starts out dry and turns creamy (perhaps we’re imagining the custard).

BrewDog Alice Porter – 5.2%

Although not explicitly named after Carroll’s Alice, it’s hard to believe that the canny marketers at BrewDog were unaware of the association. Indeed, the Alice Porter comes closest of our trio to embracing the ‘drink me’ tastes. Cherry, toffee, and burnt toast are strongly in evidence, as is a meaty flavour akin to roasted turkey skin.

This missing element here is pineapple, which we hope to find in other (sadly yet-untasted) Alice beers:

New Holland Brewing’s Mad Hatter Midwest IPA

Rabbit Hole Brewing’s Off with Your Red and Tweedleyum

Wonderland Brewing Company’s Alice Blonde

Weetwood Ale’s Cheshire Cat and Mad Hatter

[1] See, most recently, Michael Parrish Lee, ‘Eating Things: Food, Animals, and Other Life Forms in Lewis Carroll’s Alice Books’, Nineteenth-Century Literature 68 (2014), 484-512.

[2] See Thomas Fensch, Alice in Acidland (Woodlands, TX: New Century Books, 1970).

Zoe Jaques and Eugene Giddens

Erika Gaffney Honored at the Attending to Early Modern Women Conference

Erika Gaffney award Early Modern WomenWe are exceedingly pleased and proud to share the news that Ashgate’s Publishing Manager for Literary & Visual Studies, Erika Gaffney, was honored at this year’s Attending to Early Modern Women conference. The Society feted her not only with an impressive cake but also with a most beautiful gift: an etching after Rembrandt by Master Engraver Amand Durand presented by Merry Wiesner-Hanks, editor of the Sixteenth-Century Journal and the Journal of World History.

Professor Wiesner-Hanks writes,

“The Attending to Early Modern Women conference and the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women were pleased to present a small token of our thanks to Erika Gaffney for her inspirational and tireless work at Ashgate Press at a book launch of Mapping Gendered Routes and Spaces in the Early Modern World at the ATW conference in Milwaukee in June. Her sponsorship of the series Women and Gender in the Early Modern World, and other books on topics dear to our hearts, has allowed exciting multidisciplinary scholarship to flourish and scores of able young scholars to advance in their careers. When members of the audience at the launch were asked to stand if they had been published by Ashgate, nearly half did, and when asked to stand if they WISHED to be published by Ashgate, all did. To a woman (and a few men), they told stories about how wonderful it has been to work with Erika, and the way she has helped the field to remain dynamic and growing at a time when other publishers are slashing their lists. We truly could not have come as far as we have without her.”

We congratulate Erika on receiving this well-deserved acknowledgment of her outstanding service to the profession.

A guest blog post from Francis Lyall and Paul B. Larsen, authors of Space Law: A Treatise

Posted by Luana Life, Marketing Coordinator

Space LawFrancis Lyall and Paul B. Larsen, authors of Space Law: A Treatise, contribute their brilliance to our blog today. Space Law is an Editor’s Choice title in our Law list.

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Lyall and Larsen, Space Law: A Treatise, 2009

On 4 October 1957 – that’s nearly sixty years ago – the world was startled by Sputnik I. Since then space has transformed modern life. We watch satellite tv. Email, data and other Internet communications go through orbiting relay points. Global positioning systems let us find our way on unfamiliar routes or to roam the countryside in relative safety. We can even track and find wandering Alzheimer sufferers using that technology and terrestrial telephony. Aircraft, ships and motor vehicles can now know exactly where they are. Weather is monitored and increasingly accurate predictions made. Ships and planes avoid storms. Potential disasters, volcanic and otherwise, are predictable, and we react to dire events using satellite technology to inform our actions. We monitor land use, farming, vegetation coverage, and aridity. Guano deposits allow the detection from space of otherwise inaccessible penguin colonies. We track fisheries, ocean health and climatic events such as El Niño and its cognate La Niña.

Such benefits apart, space has also allowed major developments in our understanding of the universe. We have been to the Moon and will go again. Our robotic rovers explore Mars and report their findings. The Hubble Space Telescope and its successors have shown something of the beauty and complexity of our Universe and given our astronomers much to work on. While this blog was being written the New Horizons probe was transmitting fascinating views of the dwarf planet Pluto and its moon Charon. Having scrutinised some of the outer planets the Voyager probes and Pioneers 10 and 11 have left the solar system and are now in interstellar space. Their radio-isotopic batteries may keep them in touch with Earth for a little while yet.

Space Law undergirds all these developments. One fundamental is that all satellite use requires good radio communication between space and ground stations. The mechanisms of the International Telecommunication Union, based in Geneva since 1865, provide these, allocating appropriate radio frequencies for space purposes from 1959. The other fundamental is that there should be international agreement as to the ground-rules for the use of space. This was achieved initially through the United Nations, and implemented in national legislation. In 1963 the UN adopted a declaration of general principles to govern the activities of states in space and between 1967 and 1979 adopted five international treaties to flesh out these principles. Importantly the 1967 Outer Space Treaty provided that there is no national sovereignty in space. Space is free for all to use, but not to the exclusion of others. Treaties cover such matters as state duties to license and supervise their own activities in space and those of their nationals, state responsibility for these activities, the rescue and return of astronauts, the registration of satellites, the consequences of accidents, and (less successfully) how the Moon and other natural space objects are explored and (perhaps later) exploited. Later UN Resolutions and recommendations have dealt with matters including how states permit remote sensing, use nuclear power sources on spacecraft, register space objects, disseminate the benefits of space and mitigate space debris. Within the UN the Office for Outer Space Affairs has been helpful in developing good practice and the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) continues to discuss and debate.

There is much still to be done. How can financial loans be secured over satellites in orbit? Can asteroids be mined and what rules should apply? Should the crewing of long-range explorations be organised on military or civilian lines? Who should cope with an asteroid on collision course with Earth, and how? What if extraterrestrials are detected?

We were there at the beginning. We met in 1963 as part of the intake that year to the Institute of Air and Space Law at McGill University in Montreal. Thereafter FL went into academe at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, and PBL into government service in the US Department of Transportation while also teaching as an Adjunct Professor in Georgetown University, Washington, DC, where his duties included acting as lawyer for the team that prepared the US global positioning system for civilian use. He has also been involved in negotiations about security interests in space objects. And so our interest in space continued. We both published articles, and FL a book.

By the mid-2000s Space Law had become a wide field, difficult for a single individual adequately to encompass, so, pooling our knowledge, we came together to produce our Treatise on Space Law. Our aim was – and is – readably to inform, sharing the scope and potential of this vibrant emergent field of law to benefit both practitioners and students.

Our understanding is that our aim has been met, thanks to Ashgate. A second edition is under way.

Francis Lyall and Paul B. Larsen

The first title in our Universal Reform series is just published

Posted by Hattie Wilson, Senior Marketing Executive

Transnational Networks and Cross-Religious Exchange in the Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean and Atlantic WorldsWe are delighted to announce that our new series, Universal Reform: Studies in Intellectual History, 1550-1700 has just published its first title. Transnational Networks and Cross-Religious Exchange in Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean and Atlantic Worlds by Brandon Marriott examines the claim by Antonio de Montezinos in 1644 that he had discovered the Lost Tribes of Israel in the jungles of South America, and how this news spread across Europe and the Ottoman Empire. Marriott reveals the importance of early-modern crises, diasporas and newsgathering networks in generating eschatological constructs and transforming them through a process of intercultural dissemination into complex new hybrid religious conceptions and identities.

The Universal Reform series, edited by Howard Hotson and Vladimír Urbánek, examines the attempts by a wide variety of Post-Reformation intellectuals to extend the reforming impulse from the spheres of church and theology to many different areas of life and thought.

Within these ambitious reforming projects, impulses originating in the Reformation mixed inextricably with projects emerging from the late-Renaissance and with the ongoing transformations of communications, education, art, literature, science, medicine, and philosophy.  Although specialised literatures exist to study these individual developments, they do not comfortably accommodate studies of how these components were sometimes brought together in the service of wider reforms. By providing a natural home for fresh research uncomfortably accommodated within Renaissance studies, Reformation studies, and the histories of science, medicine, philosophy, and education, Universal Reform pursues a more synoptic understanding of individuals, movements, and networks pursuing further and more general reform by bringing together studies rooted in all of these sub-disciplinary historiographies.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal for the Universal Reform series, please contact the publisher, Thomas Gray

Guest Post from Roger Cotterrell

Posted by Luana Life, Marketing Coordinator

Roger CotterrellRoger Cotterrell, Professor of Legal Theory at Queen Mary, University of London, UK, provides today’s guest blog. He is the author of Law, Culture and Society: Legal Ideas in the Mirror of Social Theory — an Editor’s Choice title in our Law list. The following post includes background information about the book and his research motivations, thoughts, and experiences that helped shape the volume’s success and contribution to the field.

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Law culture and societyLaw, Culture and Society originated in a series of essays written over an eight year period. But it was intended as far more than just a collection of linked papers. I saw all of the studies that contributed to it as part of a single, tightly integrated project, even if one with several branches. I wanted to show through this book what I had come to see as a necessary new perspective on the study of law in society. Since I had long been interested in legal theory and committed to studying law from a sociological perspective, the book was a kind of first summation of what I had gradually worked out as the most productive way to apply this sociological outlook in a theoretically consistent way in interpreting legal ideas. So, it was subtitled ‘legal ideas in the mirror of social theory’. As in much of my work, a guiding motivation was to show the relevance of sociological insights for juristic, doctrinal studies of law – the kinds of studies with which lawyers and law students are most familiar.

Looking back now, a decade after the book’s original publication, I can see two factors as especially important in determining the form that Law, Culture and Society took. The first was that in the years leading up to its publication I had become increasingly interested in comparative legal studies – an area of legal scholarship that throughout its development has been more open than most to making alliances with the social sciences. The strong links I had developed with comparative lawyers encouraged me to consider more carefully how sociological perspectives could aid them, and to ask how the whole enterprise of comparative law could acquire more solid theoretical foundations by drawing on ideas from social theory. So, the book was written partly to address students of comparative law.

It seemed obvious that comparative legal studies would become more important in a globalising world. Pressures to harmonise law across national boundaries were becoming more intense. But at the same time ‘local’ cultures – often reflecting particular traditions, values and allegiances – clearly sought to resist some of these harmonising pressures and called on law to express their distinctiveness. There seemed to be a dual movement focused on law: it must seek the efficiency of similarity produced through harmonisation but it must also appreciate cultural difference. As a consequence, ‘culture’ would have to become a very important focus of attention for legal scholars.

Sociology and anthropology had already developed many ideas about the nature of culture that deserved attention. However, when I came to examine carefully the ideas about ‘legal culture’ that were current in socio-legal studies I felt they lacked rigour. So an important part of my project, reflected in Law, Culture and Society, was to find a way of thinking about culture that could be conceptually defensible, consistent and systematic, and practically relevant for legal analysis as well as for social scientific inquiries about law.

A second main factor also shaped the book’s form. I had come to feel that the old agenda of socio-legal studies – to study the interaction between ‘law’ and ‘society’ – was becoming exhausted. Socio-legal scholars had tended to treat ‘society’ as referring to national societies and ‘law’ as the law of nation states. But social research showed that social and economic relationships were increasingly transnational and international, and law in practice was less and less confined to national law. Law, Culture and Society introduces and develops the idea of communal networks that can cross nation state boundaries, and it suggests that different kinds of communal relationship typically pose different legal problems and present different regulatory needs. Equally, the diversity of communal networks within national societies is a matter of great juristic relevance. So, the book tries to displace the old fixation with national societies as law’s sole concern in favour of a much more open view of communal networks – national, intra-national and transnational.

I had not been thinking of culture when I first wrote about communal networks. However, I came to think that culture could be best understood in terms of them. It could be seen as the bonds that allow these various networks to exist. So, the book’s approach was intended to suggest new agendas for social study of law. I used it to reconsider the possibilities for ‘transplanting’ law from one cultural environment to another, as well as the nature of authority in comparative law, and the multifaceted character of culture as a concern for law. More broadly, I claimed that the law-and-community approach could help to clarify one of the most basic foci of legal analysis – the idea of responsibility.

Since the book appeared I have further developed its approach, which has also been used by other scholars working in diverse fields. Today we can at least see clearly that social studies of law are becoming ever more important and that their character is changing as law becomes more transnational and international, and as networks of socio-economic relations become ever more varied, diverse and intricate within and across national boundaries. Socio-legal researchers and socially-aware lawyers surely have plenty of work to do and I hope that Law, Culture and Society can still prove helpful.

Roger Cotterrell

June 22nd 2015

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Examination Copies of this title are available on a 60 day trial basis for lecturers considering course adoption. To request a copy of a book, fill out the online inspection/examination form.

Inspiring a Medico-Legal Revolution: Essays in Honour of Sheila McLean

Posted by Sarah Stilwell, Senior Marketing Executive

Sheila McLean photoSheila McLean has been associated with Ashgate since 1980 and we were absolutely delighted to have the opportunity to publish this book in her honour. The book itself is a fitting and eloquent tribute to Sheila’s remarkable career and role in the development of medico-legal studies as an academic subject. Alison Kirk, publisher of Ashgate’s law list, who was present at the dinner organised by Sheila’s colleagues in her honour, concluded her appreciation with the words: ‘It was an absolute pleasure working with Sheila and we will miss her. Ashgate would like to thank her for all her hard work both as an author and series editor. We wish her all the very best for a well-deserved, long and happy retirement’.

Inspiring a medico-legal revolution Sheila McleanPublished this month, Inspiring a Medico-Legal Revolution: Essays in Honour of Sheila McLean is edited by Pamela Ferguson, University of Dundee, UK and Graeme Laurie, University of Edinburgh, UK

‘Inspiring a Medico-Legal Revolution epitomizes more than just its contents. It reflects the career and research of Sheila McLean herself. All parts of the book are provocative and insightful, addressing a wide range of controversial topics. It is rare that so many recognized legal scholars together contribute to a book that spans legal issues at the beginning of life, in medical care, professional liability, as well as regulatory and end of life issues. But then, how else to honour such an esteemed colleague? Readers will be all the more enriched.’  Bartha Maria Knoppers, McGill University, Canada

‘This collection of essays is a fitting endorsement of the contributions to the field that Professor Sheila McLean has made. This is an inspiring collection which will provide a lasting tribute to her work.’   Jane Kaye, University of Oxford, UK

‘This is a true celebration of Sheila McLean’s free and indomitable spirit. The impressive range and richness of the essays show her enduring influence as an academic pioneer, a warm mentor and friend, a dedicated internationalist, and a tireless gadfly in the bodies of institutionalised medicine and law.’   Alastair V. Campbell, National University of Singapore

Click here for more information on books published by Ashgate in the field of medical law

Click here for more information on Sheila McLean’s academic and professional appointments

BIALL Life Membership Award 2015 awarded to Loyita Worley

Posted by Helen Moore, Marketing Manager

The BIALL Life Membership Award 2015 has been awarded to Loyita Worley, Director of EMEA Library Operations, Reed Smith.

The British and Irish Association of Law Librarian’s (BIALL) awarded the BIALL Life Membership Award 2015 to Loyita Worley at the BIALL Annual Dinner, which took place in the Hilton Brighton Metropole on 12 June 2015.

This is an award that is bestowed on current BIALL members who have had active and distinguished careers within Law Librarianship, and who have been substantially involved with BIALL. Loyita has been active in BIALL for 30 years and has stayed with the same law firm, albeit in different guises, for almost as long. She has held the roles of Membership Secretary, Council Member and in 1999 Chair of BIALL (the former term for “President”), the first member from a law firm to be elected to this office.

BIALL handbook of legal information managementLoyita edited the first edition of the BIALL Handbook of Legal Information Management published in 2006 and stepped in again more recently to take over as editor of the 2nd edition as well as contributing one of the chapters.

It was with great pleasure that BIALL president Marianne Barber presented Loyita with the Life Membership Award.