Category Archives: prizes

The Islamic Villa in Early Medieval Iberia wins the 2015 Eleanor Tufts Award – Congratulations Glaire D. Anderson!

Posted by Luana Life, Marketing Coordinator

The Islamic Villa in Early Medieval IberiaEvery year the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies recognizes an outstanding publication in the area of Spanish or Portuguese art history. This year the committee has honored Glaire D. Anderson’s book, The Islamic Villa in Early Medieval Iberia with the award and remarked:

‘This publication met and surpassed the stipulated award criteria of “originality of conception, thoroughness of research, rigor of argument, brilliance of insight, significance of findings, and clarity of expression.” Although the book will engage and satisfy specialists in Islamic art and architecture, Anderson’s clear prose makes it accessible and valuable to anyone with an interest in a host of related fields.’ The 2015 Eleanor Tufts Book Award Committee

Previous reviews have also applauded the book:

‘Architects, historians, and art historians, as well as scholars and students of medieval culture, will undoubtedly enjoy Anderson’s book.’   Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review

‘…full of intellectual insights…’   Speculum

‘…an innovative study and an enjoyable read…’   Mariam Rosser-Owen, Victoria and Albert Museum

‘…meticulous study…’   Marcus Milwright, University of Victoria

About the Author: Glaire D. Anderson is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

Learn more about The Islamic Villa in Early Medieval Iberia.

‘Loading the Silence’ is joint winner of the Rebecca Coyle Prize

Posted by Maxine Cook, Marketing Assistant

Loading the silenceMany congratulations to Linda Ioanna Kouvaras, whose title, Loading the Silence: Australian Sound Art in the Post-Digital Age, has been awarded joint winner of the 2014 Rebecca Coyle Prize. This year the judges decided there were two titles worthy of the prize, resulting in a second 2014 publication prize being awarded to Loading the Silence. The panel described Loading the Silence as “a highly accomplished piece of scholarship – extensive, rich, complex, well written, and thorough.”

The prize is awarded annually, by the IASPM ANZ, to the best paper on popular music in Australasia. The prize is named in honour of long time IASPM ANZ member, Rebecca Coyle, to commemorate her work advancing popular music studies and mentoring emerging academic talent.

The book has previously received high praise in reviews:

“… Kouvaras has created a reference of vital importance, a book of international significance that is likely to be considered a seminal work in the study of sound art.”   Music Forum

“In Loading the Silence Linda Kouvaras does a real favour for those seeking to learn about and from the political sonicities of the avant garde of the 1970s and since. That she does so in the context of Australian musical practices makes the stories she tells all the more fascinating for those of us regrettably less familiar with that continent’s (sometimes “un-Australian”) experimentality. Refreshingly, Kouvaras’s critical curiosity embraces musical practices and places: the leaky sounds and voicings of women’s bodies, the hospital, the unwatery landscape itself… A convincing critical compendium is the result.”   George McKay, University of Salford, UK

Dr Linda Kouvaras is a Senior Lecturer at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, The University of Melbourne, Australia.

Choice Outstanding Academic Title awards for 2014

Posted by Emily Ferro, Marketing Coordinator

Ashgate is thrilled to announce that Choice has honored three Ashgate books by naming them Outstanding Academic Titles for 2014. The recognized titles are Decolonizing Social Work; Ageing, Ritual and Social Change: Comparing the secular and religious in Eastern and Western Europe; and The Ashgate Research Companion to the Thirty Years’ War. Books recognized by Choice display ‘excellence in presentation and scholarship’ and provide content of significance in their field of study. Out of the thousands of titles reviewed by Choice in 2014, only 10% were celebrated as Outstanding Academic Titles.

Decolonizing social workDecolonizing Social Work by Mel Gray, John Coates, Michael Yellow Bird, and Tiani Hetherington features articles written by Indigenous and non-Indigenous social work scholars examining local cultures, beliefs, values, and practices as central to decolonization. Choice notes that the volume is “a sturdy reminder of the vast social justice work still to do in the world.” Through careful amalgamation of the work of the essayists, Gray, Coates, Yellow Bird, and Hetherington interrogate trends, issues, and debates in Indigenous social work theory, practice methods, and education models. Choice compliments the book’s readability and its glossary, and highly recommends it to all academics, libraries, and practitioners.

Ageing ritual and social changeAgeing, Ritual and Social Change by Peter Coleman, Daniela Koleva, and Joanna Bornat explores European changes in religious and secular beliefs and practices related to life passages. “The editors and contributors deserve appreciation for undertaking this challenging comparative project,” writes Choice, calling the collection “A significant multidisciplinary contribution to the literature on aging, religion/ritual, comparative oral history, and social change.” Drawing on fascinating oral histories of older people’s memories in both Eastern and Western Europe, this book presents illuminating views on peoples’ quests for existential meaning in later life. Choice highly recommends Ageing, Ritual and Social Change for upper-division undergraduates and up.

Ashgate research companion to the thirty years warThe final book named an Outstanding Academic Title of 2014 is The Ashgate Research Companion to the Thirty Years’ War by Olaf Asbach and Peter Schröder. A comprehensive and authoritative overview of research on one of the most destructive conflicts in European history, Choice notes that this book “will serve for some time as an essential starting point for research on the origins, conduct, and legacies of the wars and the peace.” By combining the work of key international scholars, this research companion explores the complexities of the conflict using an innovative comparative approach. Choice deems this book “Essential,” recommending it to all upper-division undergraduates and up.

Congratulations to all of the honorees.

For a listing of all of our recent prizewinners, visit www.ashgate.com/prizewinners.  

“Just the right amount of provocation for readers” – Demolishing Whitehall commended in the RIBA President’s Award for Research 2014

Posted by Fiona Dunford, Marketing Executive

Ashgate are pleased to announce that Adam Sharr and Stephen Thornton, authors of Demolishing Whitehall: Leslie Martin, Harold Wilson and the Architecture of White Heat were recently shortlisted for this prestigious award in recognition of their outstanding university-located research. The RIBA President’s Award for Research acknowledges and encourages fresh and strategic thinking in architectural research for the benefit of the profession as a whole.

‘The judges applauded this outstanding work for tackling an often overlooked area. In covering various points of view, including design and politics, the judges considered the research to be a good polemic with just the right amount of provocation for readers. The author’s passion made the work all the more interesting.’   RIBA Judging Panel

Demolishing WhitehallDemolishing Whitehall tells the story of a grand 1960s plan to demolish most of Whitehall, London’s historic government district, and replace it with a ziggurat-section megastructure built in concrete. The book has been well-received  by reviewers and praised for its originality in the recounting of this largely forgotten episode in post-war history.

‘What an amazing saga. Officially commissioned early in 1964 to produce what would now be described as a ‘masterplan’ for the government quarter, the Whitehall area of London. …The story deserves to be known and is well told by Adam Sharr and Stephen Thornton.’    Architectural Review

‘What might have been a dry, academic investigation into a government planning exercise is instead imbued with wit, charm and novel insight.’    Architecture Today

Adam Sharr is Professor of Architecture at the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at Newcastle University, UK and editor of the journal Architectural Research Quarterly and Stephen Thornton is Senior Lecturer in Politics at the School of European Languages, Translation and Politics at Cardiff University, UK.

Congratulations to Catherine Burke, winner of the Anne Bloomfield Book Prize

Posted by Fiona Dunford, Marketing Executive

A life in education and architectureAshgate are delighted to announce that A Life in Education and Architecture: Mary Beaumont Medd has received the Anne Bloomfield Book Prize:  an award given by The History of Education Society recognising this work as the best book on the history of education published between 2010-13. Catherine Burke recently received her award at the Society’s annual conference in Dublin, details of which can be found on their Blog.

Enthusiastic praise for A Life in Education has come from many quarters

‘This is a generous, well-crafted review of the life of Bradford-born public sector architect Mary Medd (née Crowley, 1907-2005). As a means of gaining insight into how to design schools, Catherine Burke’s book beautifully illuminates her subject’s profound impact on the thinking and processes involved… Burke, a historian of education, shows mastery of her subject here and delivers it through a light, accessible style.’   Times Higher Education

‘…this splendid volume, engagingly written and lavishly supplied with over 100 illustrations, is the most interesting, informative and inspirational book on the history of education that I have read in 2013′   Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education

Catherine Burke is an historian and senior lecturer in education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. She has researched Mary Medd’s life and travels since the architect’s death in 2005, while at the same time engaging with architects designing schools today to bring about a better understanding of the history of the subject. Other related publications include The School I’d Like (2003) and School (2008) both with Ian Grosvenor.

Ashgate authors Iain J. M. Robertson and Richard A. Marsden shortlisted for the Saltire Society Literary Awards

Posted by Beth Whalley, Marketing Executive

Ashgate authors Iain J. M. Robertson and Richard A. Marsden were among those honoured at Scotland’s prestigious Saltire Society Literary Awards on Tuesday, 11th November 2014. Robertson and Marsden were shortlisted for the Research Book of the Year Award and History Book of the Year Award respectively, in the company of acclaimed academics and famed fiction writers, all of whom reside in Scotland, are of Scottish descent, or take a Scottish figure, historical event, or issue as their subject.

In a true celebration of Scottish literary talent, the Awards ceremony took place at Dynamic Earth, an iconic visitor attraction set at the heart of Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site, and was supported by the British Council Scotland, Waterstones, the Scottish Historical Review and the National Library of Scotland, amongst others.

Cosmo Innes and the defence of Scotlands pastBoth authors enrich our understandings of crucial moments in Scotland’s history. Marsden considers the work of the influential antiquarian Cosmo Innes (1798-1874) to answer the question of how Victorian Scots reconciled an independent history with a unionist present. Innes, a prolific editor of medieval and early modern documents relating to Scotland’s parliament, universities and church, operated within an elite network, had access to the leading intellectuals and politicians of the day, and had significant influence on a contemporary understanding of Scottish history. Marsden’s ‘masterly scholarly monograph’ (Stefan Berger, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Germany) therefore provides a window onto the ways in which the Scots viewed their own ‘national past.’ You can read more about Cosmo Innes, and its relationship with Scotland’s contested identity in the 21st century, here.

Lanscapes of Protest in the Scottish HighlandsRobertson’s ‘critical landmark in protest history’ (Carl Griffin, University of Sussex, UK) draws on oral testimony and individual case studies to provide a lens through which to explore the fluid and contingent nature of protest performances. He turns to the Scottish Highlands in November 1918. Agrarian change threatened a wave of unemployment and eviction for the land-working population, and those who had served during the First World War found themselves returning to social and economic conditions that should have been left behind. Widespread social protest rapidly followed. Robertson navigates these events in order to illustrate how a range of forms of protest demanded attention (unlike the earlier Land Wars period, these protests were successful) and illustrate the formative role of landscape in people’s lifespaces.

We’d like to extend our congratulations to Richard, Iain, and all the other winners and shortlisted authors honoured at the awards.

Richard A. Marsden works for Cardiff University where he teaches History and coordinates a foundation pathway enabling adults without formal qualifications to progress onto degrees in the historical disciplines. More information about Cosmo Innes and the Defence of Scotland’s Past c. 1825-1875

Iain J. M. Robertson is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Gloucestershire. More information about Landscapes of Protest in the Scottish Highlands after 1914: The Later Highland Land Wars

Honorable Mention for Cruz and Stampino’s ‘Early Modern Habsburg Women’ at the SSEMW Book Awards

Posted by Beth Whalley, Marketing Executive

Early Modern Habsburg WomenWe’re delighted to announce that the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women has awarded an honourable mention to Early Modern Habsburg Women: Transnational Contexts, Cultural Conflicts, Dynastic Continuities (2013) in the category of Best Collaborative Project in their 2013 Book Awards. The society awards this prize to the best edited collection or multi-authored volume on women and gender in the early modern period.

The committee declared that they were particularly impressed by:

“how the collection gathers together in one place essays on six remarkable women of the Spanish and Austrian Habsburg dynasties. The transnational, comparative, and interdisciplinary scope of the essays illuminate the complex negotiations performed by these powerful women who crossed borders defined by gender, geography, language, culture, and politics. The volume exemplifies the richness of women’s history that travels across and between political, disciplinary, and methodological boundaries.”

The six Habsburg women examined in the volume – queens, duchesses, vicereines, and even a nun – had a lasting impact on the diplomatic map of early modern Europe. Through an investigation of archival documents, pictorial and historical accounts, literature, and correspondence, as well as cultural artifacts such as paintings, jewellery and clothing, contributors bring to light the real power of early modern Habsburg women as they moved from court to court and transferred their cultural, religious and diplomatic traditions.

The volume, edited by Anne J. Cruz and Maria Galli Stampino, boasts a variety of contributors from across the globe, and we would like to congratulate each of them for this latest achievement. This isn’t the first time that an Ashgate book co-edited by Anne J. Cruz has been honoured by the SSEMW; Women’s Literacy in Early Modern Spain and the New World (2011) won the prize for Best Collaborative Project in 2011.

About the Editors: Anne J. Cruz is Professor of Spanish and Cooper Fellow at the University of Miami. Maria Galli Stampino is Professor of Italian and French also at the University of Miami.

Contributors: Anne J. Cruz; Joseph F. Patrouch; Maria Galli Stampino; Blythe Alice Raviola; Magdalena S. Sánchez; Vanessa de Cruz Medina; Félix Labrador Arroyo; María Cruz de Carlos Varona; Silvia Z. Mitchell; Mercedes Llorente; Laura Oliván Santaliestra; Cordula van Wyhe.

More information about Early Modern Habsburg Women: Transnational Contexts, Cultural Conflicts, Dynastic Continuities