Category Archives: Sociology

Gibson Burrell awarded the Joanne Martin Trailblazer Award 2014

Gibson Burrell, Professor at the School of Management at the University of Leicester, was presented with the Joanne Martin Trailblazer award at the recent AOM meeting in Philadelphia. The award is an accolade for exceptional career achievement, and is given by the Organization and Management Theory (OMT) Division of the Academy of Management.

From OMTweb:

“The Joanne Martin Trailblazer Award is presented once every two years. The award recognizes scholars who have taken a leadership role in the field of OMT by opening up new lines of thinking or inquiry. A Trailblazer is a boundary-spanner and a conversation starter, someone who extends and builds the OMT community by shepherding new ideas and new scholarship, often in unconventional ways. Actions that may indicate “trailblazing” behavior include starting up or moving forward a journal or scholarly series, organizing a conference or workshop, and beginning or continuing a conversation about a set of OMT ideas.

The establishment of the award was motivated by the retirement of Joanne Martin. An important part of her legacy is that she has challenged and extended the boundaries of OMT. She was a critical voice in research on culture, and she leveraged her position in an attempt to bring feminism and critical theory into the mainstream of organization theory. Professor Martin encouraged people that wouldn’t have traditionally been considered in the mainstream of organization theory to develop ideas that did not fit into existing theories and has thus broadened the membership of OMT.”

Sociological paradigms and organisational analysisGibson Burrell is Professor of Organisation Theory at Leicester and was Head of the School of Management from 2002-7. He is co-author (with Gareth Morgan) of the classic book Sociological Paradigms and Organisational Analysis.

Queering Fat Embodiment’s social media book tour

Posted by Michael Drapper, Marketing Executive

Queering Fat EmbodimentCongratulations to the editors of Queering Fat EmbodimentCat Pausé, Jackie Wykes, and Samantha Murray – for hosting a successful global book launch using Google Hangouts on Air! If you missed the live launch, you can watch a recording of it here.

Against the backdrop of the ever-growing medicalisation, pathologisation, and commodification of fatness, coupled with the moral panic over an alleged ‘obesity epidemic’, this volume brings together the latest scholarship from various critical disciplines to challenge existing ideas of fat and fat embodiment. Queer is a heterogeneous and multidisciplinary practice aimed at ‘bringing forth’ and thus denaturalising the taken for granted, the invisible, the normalized. This book examines the ways in which fat embodiment is lived, experienced, regulated and (re)produced across a range of cultural sites and contexts.

Queering Fat Embodiment is the first book to focus on the intersection of queer studies and fat studies, and promises to be a classic in its field. What could be more exciting than discussions of fat and queer fashion, desire, performance, cyberspace, and politics, as well as the fluidity of gender identity, bodies, and sexuality? It’s a great read,’ reviewed Dr Esther Rothblum, editor of Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight & Society

‘Queering Fat Embodiment is an important contribution to the emerging literature of Fat Studies because it restates the necessity for radical critique and makes space for anti-assimilationist activism. The book offers an exciting balance of better-known contributors and fresh new voices and I highly recommend it to anybody interested in developing a critical understanding of fat and obesity,’ notes Dr Charlotte Cooper of The Obesity Timebomb.

Queering Fat Embodiment sheds light on the ways in which fat embodiment is lived, experienced, regulated, and (re)produced across a range of cultural sites and contexts. Contributing authors include Katie LeBesco, Robyn Longhurst, Jenny Lee, Margitte Kristjansson, Stefanie Jones, Kimberly Dark, James Burford, Sam Orchard, Scott Beattie and Zoë Meleo-Erwin.

The editors are currently conducting a social media book tour, with stops along the way on blogs, online magazines, Tumblr, Twitter, YouTube, and more! If you’d like to follow along the tour, tour stops are updated here.

Understanding the Tea Party Movement

Understanding the Tea Party MovementUnderstanding the Tea Party Movement is edited by Nella Van Dyke, University of California, Merced, USA, and David S. Meyer, University of California, Irvine, USA

‘With the rise and now potential decline of the Tea Party movement, we have been sorely in need of a volume explaining this pivotal early 21st century conservative mobilization. With Van Dyke and Meyer’s edited volume, containing chapters written by scholars foremost in their field, we now have the definitive source on this fascinating and important social movement.’   Holly McCammon, Vanderbilt University, USA

‘When the Tea Party movement erupted, it challenged mainstream politics and scholars: where did the Tea Party’s resources come from? Who were its supporters? What defined their goals and identities? In this volume, some of the most insightful scholars of social movements today provide convincing answers to these questions. Better than any other, this volume shows why the Tea Party emerged and how it has reshaped the political landscape.’   Jack A. Goldstone, George Mason University, USA

Hailing themselves as heirs to the American Revolution, the Tea Party movement staged tax day protests in over 750 US cities in April 2009, quickly establishing a large and volatile social movement. Tea Partiers protested at town hall meetings about health care across the country in August, leading to a large national demonstration in Washington on September 12, 2009.

The movement spurred the formation (or redefinition) of several national organizations and many more local groups, and emerged as a strong force within the Republican Party. Self-described Tea Party candidates won victories in the November 2010 elections.

Even as activists demonstrated their strength and entered government, the future of the movement’s influence, and even its ultimate goals, are very much in doubt. In 2012, Barack Obama, the movement’s prime target, decisively won re-election, Congressional Republicans were unable to govern, and the Republican Party publicly wrestled with how to manage the insurgency within.

Although there is a long history of conservative movements in America, the library of social movement studies leans heavily to the left. The Tea Party movement, its sudden emergence and its uncertain fate, provides a challenge to mainstream American politics. It also challenges scholars of social movements to reconcile this new movement with existing knowledge about social movements in America.

Understanding the Tea Party Movement addresses these challenges by explaining why and how the movement emerged when it did, how it relates to earlier eruptions of conservative populism, and by raising critical questions about the movement’s ultimate fate.

About the Editors:

Nella Van Dyke is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Merced, USA. She is the editor of Strategic Alliances: Coalition Building and Social Movements.

David S. Meyer is Professor of Sociology, Political Science, and Planning, Policy, and Design at the University of California, Irvine, USA. He is the author of The Politics of Protest: Social Movements in America and editor of Routing the Opposition: Social Movements, Public Policy, and Democracy in America and Social Movements: Identity, Culture, and the State.

Contributors: Rory McVeigh; Tina Fetner; Brayden G. King; Paul Almeida, Nella Van Dyke; David S. Meyer, Amanda Pullum, Abby Scher, Chip Berlet; Deana A. Rohlinger, Jesse Klein; Ruth Braunstein.

Recent reviews by the LSE Review of Books

The LSE Review of Books regularly features Ashgate titles. It’s a fantastic site for book reviews in general, and covers a wide range of social science topics, including sociology, politics and IR, architecture, planning, gender studies, to name just a few.

Recent reviews of Ashgate books include:

Dynamics of Political Violence: A Process-Oriented Perspective on Radicalisation and the Escalation of Political Conflict, edited by Lorenzo Bosi, Chares Demetriou and Stefan Malthaner

Unconventional Warfare in South Asia: Shadow Warriors and Counterinsurgency by Scott Gates and Kaushik Roy

The Greening of Architecture: A Critical History and Survey of Contemporary Sustainable Architecture and Urban Design, by Phillip James Tabb and A. Senem Deviren

Media and the Rhetoric of Body Perfection: Cosmetic Surgery, Weight Loss and Beauty in Popular Culture by Deborah Harris-Moore

The Impact of Racism on African American Families: Literature as Social Science by Paul C. Rosenblatt

The Greening of ArchitectureUnconventional warfare in south asiaThe impact of racism on african american familiesDynamics of political violence

For more reviews visit the LSE Review of Books

Toward a Green Criminological Revolution

Exploring Green CriminologyIn their new book Exploring Green Criminology: Toward a Green Criminological Revolution, Michael J. Lynch and Paul B. Stretesky call for criminologists to take green harms more seriously, and for the discipline of criminology to be revolutionized so that it forms part of the solution to the large environmental problems currently faced across the world.

‘In this book two pioneers of Green Criminology show how the perspective can enrich traditional criminology and make it more relevant to a world in danger. This is an impressive and important work, recommended to anyone with an interest in green issues and the future of criminology or the planet.’   Nigel South, University of Essex, UK

‘Lynch and Stretesky’s call for a revolution in criminology that would redirect the field away from its historic attention to personal crimes and toward the far graver threats posed by blameworthy environmental wrongdoing is a must read for any criminologist who hopes to remain relevant to the future of our planet.’   Raymond J. Michalowski, Northern Arizona University, USA

‘In Exploring Green Criminology, Lynch and Stretesky lay out an ambitious framework and research agenda for the future of green criminology. In this groundbreaking work, they demonstrate how traditional criminology must adapt, if it is to remain relevant in an era of human history that is replete with environmental crime.’   Michael A. Long, Oklahoma State University, USA

Here is an edited extract of Chapter 1 of Exploring Green Criminology:

The earth is being destroyed as we watch, often as we do too little to stop the destruction. Today, for example, the Global Footprint Network estimates that it takes the earth one and one-half years to regenerate the resources that we have extracted from the earth in a year. This means that we are using the earth’s resources at a greater rate than is sustainable.

Unfortunately unsustainable business practices have been occurring since the early 1980s and are accelerating at such a rapid rate that we will consume nearly three times what the earth can regenerate annually by the year 2050 (Global Footprint Network, 2013). To be sure, there are those who take note of these alarming trends and are doing something to work toward sustainability. But, the efforts of a few individuals when compared to the majority of the human race are too little to overcome the devastating and unsustainable forces humans unleash on the planet. Thus we hide our head in the sand. We hope that divine intervention1 or the next generation can prevent the impending ecological calamity. However, there may not be too many more next generations and time is running out to take care of the problem.

It is not our intention to write about the general neglect of environmental problems within society at large. Rather, our topic is much more limited, and is in many ways simply a microcosm of these broader social tendencies to turn a blind eye and a deaf ear toward environmental problems. In the scheme of things, the small area we address in this work appears to have little relevance to the vast problems of ecological destruction that lay before us as humans. Yet, that is, perhaps, precisely the point. All these small situations and contexts sum together to create our unsustainable and devastating behavior that result in massive ecological destruction. Since many people believe that the big ecological problems of the world are too big to tackle, the alternative is to approach these problems at smaller levels of aggregation. The hope is that changing each small situation will lead to large-scale change. Whether or not that is true is hard to determine and it is entirely possible that small change is an inefficient and ineffective strategy to prevent large-scale global harm.

We, as criminologists, are concerned with the general neglect of ecological issues in criminology. We are concerned with teaching people lessons about crime, law and justice within the context of our biosphere. Indeed, a small number of criminologists continually call attention to the fact that criminology neglects widespread and important forms of harm such as green or environmental crimes. And still other criminologists suggest that these green crimes present the most important challenge to criminology as a discipline. As criminologists, we are not simply concerned that our discipline continues to neglect green issues, we are disturbed by the fact that as a discipline, criminology is unable to perceive the wisdom of taking green harms more seriously, and the need to reorient itself in ways that make it part of the solution to the large global environmental problems we now face as the species that produces those problems.

We expect that most criminologists will reject the idea that they ought to be paying greater attention to the problems of green crimes and justice. After all, the history of criminology as a discipline is the history of an academic field devoted to the study of ordinary forms of street offending and efforts to control those offenses. In our view, these offenses and their consequences are quite small in comparison to the forms of environmental destruction taking place in the world around us. Yes, people are hurt by crime—but those are small hurts when one considers them in comparison to the end of humanity.

As criminologists we are dissatisfied to be part of a discipline that has become rather meaningless within the context of the modern world. The meaninglessness of criminology in that context will not change overnight, and this book may have little impact on that situation. Yet, at the same time, we feel that it is our obligation to propose that this situation needs to change, and to outline the ways in which criminologists can actively engage in research of importance in the contemporary world.

While the research of criminologists is unlikely to change the world, any small step forward that addresses green crime and justice is a step in the right direction, and contributes to changing the social attitudes and practices needed to help reform the behaviors that have produced the ecologically damaging situation in which we now find ourselves. While our book is no solution to the ecological problems of our times, it exposes a way of thinking that pushes the discipline of criminology closer to being relevant in the modern context of ecological destruction.

To take this step forward, this book explores the parameters of green criminology, its theory and practice, and why environmental issues ought to become more central to the study of crime, law, and justice, or, more specifically, an integral part of criminological research and the criminological imagination.

We argue that if harm is the primary concern addressed by criminology—that is, if criminology exists as a science designed to understand, address, reduce, or eliminate crime in the hope of reducing or eliminating harms and to promote justice for humans, nonhumans, and the environment—then criminologists need to recreate criminology, redesign its focus, open it to new understandings of harms and crimes, criminals, laws, corrective responses to crime and harms, victims, and justice.

But how do we redesign criminology to consider environmental harm as an important area of study in an era when the destruction of the earth and the world’s ecosystem is the predominant concern of our times? And, if we are correct in stating that this has yet to happen, we must ask why this has not been accomplished given that this situation has been known for quite some time.

The how question comprises a large section of this work, and is illustrated in various chapters that apply an environmental frame of reference that underlies a green approach to issues that can be addressed within criminology.

Taking this environmental frame of reference as the starting point and applying it to criminological issues is the substance of green criminology. Such a perspective helps us to see criminology in a new way that is only apparent once this green environmental frame of reference is adopted.

Read the whole of chapter one on Ashgate’s website

About the Authors:

Michael J. Lynch is a professor in the department of criminology, and associated faculty in the Patel School of Global Sustainability, at the University of South Florida. He has been engaged in research on green criminology since 1990. His other interests include radical criminology, racial bias in criminal justice processes, and corporate crime and its control. He is the recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society of Criminology’s Division on Critical Criminology.

Paul B. Stretesky is a Professor of Criminology in the Department of Languages and Social Science at Northumbria University. In addition to his research on green criminology, he is engaged in research on families of homicide victims and missing persons, and the study of environmental justice. He is co-author of Guns, Violence and Criminal Behavior: Accounts from the Inside as well as Environmental Crime, Law and Justice.

Exploring Green Criminology: Toward a Green Criminological Revolution is published in Ashgate’s Green Criminology series

 

The History of Learning Disability

chris-goodey1This is a guest post from Chris Goodey

A group of academics from five separate disciplines – Education, Ancient History, Social Work, English Literature, and a stray teacher of mature students (myself) – have put together a WordPress site which is based on our common interest in conceptual history but which also invites immediate engagement with politics and public affairs. The topic is intellectual disability, or learning disability, or developmental disability, or cognitive disability, or mental handicap, or mental retardation. And that’s just the current usages.

No wonder the conceptual history is deeply problematic – and therefore of deep interest to those involved. For the rest of you, perhaps not. So far. But I do assure you that if you value your status as intelligent people, you will need to know how to defend yourself against the notion that both intellectual disability and “intelligence” itself are not natural kinds but historically contingent ways in which human beings represent themselves to themselves and to each other, and no more. We can’t advise you how to defend yourselves, but at least our shocking notions will reveal the massive nature of the challenge.

My original idea was to create a personal website that would, among other things, reinforce the excellent job Ashgate had done in publishing and marketing my book A History of Intelligence and ‘Intellectual Disability’: The Shaping of Psychology in Early Modern Europe. It soon became clear, though, that a collective effort was both needed and possible, the number of people with a historical research orientation in this field being very small. Tim Stainton, Murray Simpson, Lynn Rose, Patrick McDonagh and I think we have started something that will radically alter present directions in the critical analysis of psychological concepts. WordPress seems the ideal means. Time will tell.

Chris Goodey has held teaching posts at Ruskin College, Oxford, the Open University and the University of London Institute of Education, and is currently an independent consultant working for national and local government services on learning disability in the UK. He is the author of A History of Intelligence and ‘Intellectual Disability': The Shaping of Psychology in Early Modern Europe

Goodey case_Goodey case‘This timely, daring and challenging book… a phenomenally ambitious, interesting and reflective interdisciplinary history of ideas… assembles some convincing evidence for the processes by which changing sets of ideas, or an accident of historical contingencies, have come to shape allegedly incontrovertible universal truths. At the risk of turning a tautological phrase, this is a highly intellectual history of intellectual disability.’ Medical History

Ashgate Author, Roger Cotterrell, Awarded the Socio-Legal Studies Association (SLSA) 2013 Prize for Contributions to the Socio-Legal Community

The Socio-Legal Studies Association (SLSA) was formed in 1990, established as a result of the Socio-Legal Group’s annual meeting (now a conference) for socio-legal scholars to gather and circulate their work.  The conference, however, is not the SLSA’s only annual occurrence.  They also facilitate three annual awards, one of which is the SLSA Prize for Contributions to the Socio-Legal Community.  It is this prize we are pleased to announce that Ashgate author, Roger Cotterrell, of Law, Culture and Society (among several others) has been awarded.

Cotterell is formally trained in both law and sociology from the University of London and has been an academician for some time.  He’s been an Anniversary Professor of Legal Theory at School of Law, Queen Mary, University of London since 2005—which was the same year he was elected as a Fellow of the British Academy. This honor is given only to a select few law professors and is considered the highest recognition for scholars in the UK.  This alone illustrates the importance of Cotterrell’s work to the field.

However, prior to this most recent appointment as Anniverary Professor, Cotterrell served in various other capacities, including the Acting Head and Head of the College’s Department of Law (1989–1991), Dean of the Faculty of Laws (1993–1996), and Professor of Legal Theory (1990–2005).  And, before joining the Queen Mary faculty, he taught at the University of Leicester. He has held several visiting academic positions over the years, spanning across the globe from Texas to Brussels to Hong Kong.  He’s served on countless journal advisory boards also with an international range, including but not limited to the Journal of Law and Society (UK); Griffith Law Review (Australia); Clio & Themis (France); and Comparative Law Review (Poland).  In addition to this service, he’s authored and edited over 100 books, chapters, and journal articles over the course of his (still on-going) career.

It should be of no surprise then that other scholars in his field recognize him as an essential contributor to the Socio-Legal field.  Other scholars like David Nelken (also an Ashgate author) nominated Cotterell for this award. In his nomination letter, Nelken stated:

Roger is, for most of his peers, the leading social theorist of law and sociologist of law in
the UK, and amongst the very best worldwide…The range of his corpus of work is second
to none amongst his colleagues…Roger has been a model to generations of colleagues
and students. He is an exemplary scholar that our field is fortunate to have produced.

We congratulate Cotterrell on his most recent accomplishment and celebrate in the outstanding contributions he’s made to his field and to academia. May we also say, we are proud to have him among our Ashgate authors.

Roger Cotterrell’s other Ashgate books include: Law and Society (1994), Sociological Perspectives on Law (two volumes, 2001), Law in Social Theory (2006), Living Law (2008) and Émile Durkheim (2010).

Interested in accessing free online content to Roger Cotterrell’s book Law, Culture and Society?  Become an email subscriber and receive monthly updates on exclusive promotions and offers.  Sign up at www.ashgate.com/updates. In February 2014, we’ll be featuring Cotterrell’s book!

What does it mean to be an academic today? Why do so many students and their teachers feel like frauds?

An article by Ruth Barcan appears in the current issue of the THE – Why do some academics feel like frauds?

This is the theme of Ruth Barcan’s newly published book Academic Life and Labour in the New University: Hope and Other Choices.

Academic Life and Labour in the New University

What does it mean to be an academic today?

What kinds of experiences do students have, and how are they affected by what they learn?

Why do so many students and their teachers feel like frauds?

Can we learn to teach and research in ways that foster hope and deflate pretension?

‘Balanced, lucid and scrupulously enquiring, this is the best book I have read about the forces shaping everyday life in the new university and the dilemmas confronting teachers, researchers and students. Firmly based in the experience of work, Barcan’s case for an ethics that does not leave us stranded between despair and resignation gives those of us who still value academic life good grounds for hope indeed.’   Meaghan Morris, University of Sydney, Australia

‘Finally a book with the patience and perspective to explain the reality of work in the university today. Against the current regime of myopic productivity, Ruth Barcan offers her colleagues a vision of humility and hope. It is a vitalism that emerges when academics focus on the place that still matters and promises most: the classroom.’   Melissa Gregg, University of California, Irvine, USA

‘A deeply affecting book that will speak to the experiences of all precarious, time-pressured and surveilled academics who have found that working in the Academy is not what they expected. Ruth Barcan offers us both a powerful critique of life in the contemporary University, and a politics of hope that other, better ways are possible.’   Rosalind Gill, King’s College London, UK

Drawing on a range of international media sources, political discourse and many years’ professional experience, Academic Life and Labour in the New University explores approaches to teaching and research, with special emphasis on the importance of collegiality, intellectual honesty and courage. With attention to the intersection of large-scale institutional changes and intellectual shifts such as the rise of transdisciplinarity and the development of a pluralist curriculum, this book proposes the pursuit of more ethical, compassionate and critical forms of teaching and research.

About the Author: Ruth Barcan is a senior lecturer in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney, Australia. She is the author of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Bodies, Therapies, Senses (2011), and Nudity: A Cultural Anatomy (2004). She is also co-editor of Imagining Australian Space: Cultural Studies and Spatial Inquiry (1999), and Planet Diana: Cultural Studies and Global Mourning (1997).

More about Academic Life and Labour in the New University: Hope and Other Choices.

Ashgate is delighted to announce the launch of a new series – Memory Studies-Global Constellations

Posted by Claire Jarvis, Senior Commissioning Editor

Edited by Henri-Lustiger-Thaler, the new Memory Studies-Global Constellations series takes as its starting point the belief that the ‘past in the present’ has returned in the early twenty-first century with a vengeance, and with it the expansion of categories of experience. These experiences have largely been lost in the advance of rationalist and constructivist understandings of subjectivity and their collective representations. The cultural stakes around forgetting, ‘useful forgetting’ and remembering, locally, regionally, nationally and globally have risen exponentially. It is therefore not unusual that ‘migrant memories’; micro-histories; personal and individual memories in their interwoven relation to cultural, political and social narratives; the mnemonic past and present of emotions, embodiment and ritual; and finally, the mnemonic spatiality of geography and territories are receiving more pronounced hearings.

This transpires as the social sciences themselves are consciously globalizing their knowledge bases. In addition to the above, the reconstructive logic of memory in the juggernaut of galloping informationalization is rendering it more and more publically accessible, and therefore part of a new global public constellation around the coding of meaning and experience. Memory studies as an academic field of social and cultural inquiry emerges at a time when global public debate – buttressed by the fragmentation of national narratives – has accelerated. Societies today, in late globalized conditions, are pregnant with newly unmediated and unfrozen memories once sequestered in wide collective representations. We welcome manuscripts that examine and analyze these profound cultural traces.

This is an interdisciplinary series, with each publication appealing not only to sociologists and memory studies scholars, but a variety of disciplines which connect with the larger questions being addressed.

The series editor- Henri Lustiger-Thaler- is a specialist in the emerging field of collective memory and movements scholar at Ramapo College, New Jersey USA and Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, France. He is author of Political Arrangements: Power and the City and co-editor of Globalization and Social Movements and Urban Movements in a Globalizing World. He is currently editing a book for Ashgate entitled Reimagining Social Movements and writing a book for Yale University Press on the Orthodox Jewish experience of the Holocaust.

Both Henri and I are actively looking for new proposals for the series, so if you’d like further information, please email me at cjarvis@ashgatepublishing.com.

Film Philosophy Series Launch

Posted by Claire Jarvis, Senior Commissioning Editor

Ashgate is delighted to announce the launch of a new series – Film Philosophy at the Margins.

MacCormackEdited by Patricia MacCormack (author of Cinesexuality and Posthuman Ethics), this series picks up on the burgeoning field of ‘film philosophy’ – the shift from film analysis and explication to bringing together film with philosophy – and coalesces it with films, genres and spectator theory.

The film philosophy which underpins this series is primarily Continental philosophy, rather than the more dominant field of cognitive film philosophy, utilizing increasingly attractive philosophers for film theory such as Deleuze, Guattari, Ranciere, Foucault, Irigaray and Kristeva.

This series will establish a refined and sophisticated methodology for re-invigorating issues of alterity both in the films chosen and the means by which Continental philosophers of difference can paradigmatically alter ways of address and representation that lifts this kind of theory beyond analysis and criticism to help rethink the terrain of film theory itself.

This is an interdisciplinary series, with each publication appealing not only film scholars and non-academics interested in film, but a variety of disciplines which connect with the larger philosophical questions being addressed.

The first book in the series will be Ruth McPhee’s Female Sexuality in Contemporary Western Cinema due out in 2014.

Both Patricia and I are actively looking for new proposals for the series, so if you’d like further information, please email me at cjarvis@ashgatepublishing.com. I will also be attending the Film Philosophy conference taking place in Amsterdam in July if you’re attending and would like to arrange a face-to-face meeting.