Violence Against Women – an ongoing problem

Posted by Claire Jarvis, Senior Commissioning Editor

On the 25th of June of this year the BBC reported that there had been a record number of prosecutions for violence against women and girls. The CPS report showed that there had been 107,000 prosecutions for rape, domestic violence and ‘honour’ crimes in the year to April 2015. This figure is an increase of 18% on the previous year.

These figures demonstrate the on-going issue on violence again women in all its forms. Here at Ashgate we are proud to have published a number of recent books on the subject written by some of the leading scholars, policy-makers and activists working in this area, all with the aim of eradicating this problem once and for all.

Books Published:

Moving in the shadowsMoving in the Shadows: Violence in the Lives of Minority Women and Children (2013) Edited by Yasmin Rehman, freelance consultant, Liz Kelly, London Metropolitan University, and Hannana Siddiqui, Southall Black Sisters.

Honour based violenceHonour-Based Violence: Experiences and Counter-Strategies in Iraqi Kurdistan and the UK Kurdish Diaspora (2015) Authored by Nazand Begikhani, University of Bristol, Aisha K. Gill, University of Roehampton, and Gill Hague, University of Bristol.

Young peoples understanding of mens violence against womenYoung People’s Understandings of Men’s Violence Against Women (2015) Authored by Nancy Lombard, Glasgow Caledonian University.

Forthcoming:

Forced marriage and honour killings in BritainForced Marriage and ‘Honour’ Killings in Britain: Private Lives, Community Crimes and Public Policy Perspectives (August 2015) Authored by Christina Julios, Birkbeck, University of London and The Open University.

Eradicating Female Genital Mutilation: A UK Perspective (Forthcoming November 2015) Authored by Hilary Burrage.

Inspiring a Medico-Legal Revolution: Essays in Honour of Sheila McLean

Posted by Sarah Stilwell, Senior Marketing Executive

Sheila McLean photoSheila McLean has been associated with Ashgate since 1980 and we were absolutely delighted to have the opportunity to publish this book in her honour. The book itself is a fitting and eloquent tribute to Sheila’s remarkable career and role in the development of medico-legal studies as an academic subject. Alison Kirk, publisher of Ashgate’s law list, who was present at the dinner organised by Sheila’s colleagues in her honour, concluded her appreciation with the words: ‘It was an absolute pleasure working with Sheila and we will miss her. Ashgate would like to thank her for all her hard work both as an author and series editor. We wish her all the very best for a well-deserved, long and happy retirement’.

Inspiring a medico-legal revolution Sheila McleanPublished this month, Inspiring a Medico-Legal Revolution: Essays in Honour of Sheila McLean is edited by Pamela Ferguson, University of Dundee, UK and Graeme Laurie, University of Edinburgh, UK

‘Inspiring a Medico-Legal Revolution epitomizes more than just its contents. It reflects the career and research of Sheila McLean herself. All parts of the book are provocative and insightful, addressing a wide range of controversial topics. It is rare that so many recognized legal scholars together contribute to a book that spans legal issues at the beginning of life, in medical care, professional liability, as well as regulatory and end of life issues. But then, how else to honour such an esteemed colleague? Readers will be all the more enriched.’  Bartha Maria Knoppers, McGill University, Canada

‘This collection of essays is a fitting endorsement of the contributions to the field that Professor Sheila McLean has made. This is an inspiring collection which will provide a lasting tribute to her work.’   Jane Kaye, University of Oxford, UK

‘This is a true celebration of Sheila McLean’s free and indomitable spirit. The impressive range and richness of the essays show her enduring influence as an academic pioneer, a warm mentor and friend, a dedicated internationalist, and a tireless gadfly in the bodies of institutionalised medicine and law.’   Alastair V. Campbell, National University of Singapore

Click here for more information on books published by Ashgate in the field of medical law

Click here for more information on Sheila McLean’s academic and professional appointments

BIALL Life Membership Award 2015 awarded to Loyita Worley

Posted by Helen Moore, Marketing Manager

The BIALL Life Membership Award 2015 has been awarded to Loyita Worley, Director of EMEA Library Operations, Reed Smith.

The British and Irish Association of Law Librarian’s (BIALL) awarded the BIALL Life Membership Award 2015 to Loyita Worley at the BIALL Annual Dinner, which took place in the Hilton Brighton Metropole on 12 June 2015.

This is an award that is bestowed on current BIALL members who have had active and distinguished careers within Law Librarianship, and who have been substantially involved with BIALL. Loyita has been active in BIALL for 30 years and has stayed with the same law firm, albeit in different guises, for almost as long. She has held the roles of Membership Secretary, Council Member and in 1999 Chair of BIALL (the former term for “President”), the first member from a law firm to be elected to this office.

BIALL handbook of legal information managementLoyita edited the first edition of the BIALL Handbook of Legal Information Management published in 2006 and stepped in again more recently to take over as editor of the 2nd edition as well as contributing one of the chapters.

It was with great pleasure that BIALL president Marianne Barber presented Loyita with the Life Membership Award.

The University of Google – a guest podcast by Tara Brabazon

Posted by David Cota, Senior Marketing Coordinator

The university of googleThe University of Google is a sad book, it is an angry book, but it is a book that stands for something. It stands for commitment to scholarship.’ Tara Brabazon

In this podcast Tara Brabazon discusses her 2007 book The University of Google and the experiences that lead her to write it, the contribution it has had to its field and how it has changed her life.

The University of Google was identified by our editors as having played a significant part in the building and reputation of our publishing programme. See more Editors’ Choices here.

Tara Brabazon is Professor of Education and Head of the School of Teacher Education, Charles Sturt University, Australia and has authored several Ashgate titles, Digital Dieting – From Information Obesity to Intellectual Fitness (2013) Thinking Popular Culture (2008), and From Revolution to Revelation (2005).

The Ashgate Research Companion to Experimental Music: The Interviews

Posted by Maxine Cook, Marketing Assistant

James Saunders has uploaded his interview with Evan Parker. This is the final interview from this series.

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Interview with Evan Parker

Known for his fluid development of multiphonic aggregates to produce a constantly changing patterning, Evan Parker has evolved an instantly recognizable sound. Despite the flux of the music’s surface, he talks of his recent exploration of limited interval types to underpin his improvisations, emphasizing the reduced nature of his approach. Here practise and memorization are important, allowing the development of sequence-building methods which inform subsequent performances. The impact of group work is also of note: specific developments in his technique arose from the necessity of responding to the musicians around him, leading to the possibility of working as a soloist. Recently, his exploratory work with different groupings of musicians, taking on ‘the specifics of time and space’, has allowed the further development of the research ethos that lies at the heart of improvisation. Finding new things in new or old situations is central to experimentation. There are moments which leave an indelible mark on your memory, and hearing Parker perform live for the first time was, for me, one of these. At the beginning of a workshop in Huddersfield whilst I was a student, he talked a little about what he did, and then played for five minutes: I was completely unprepared for the complexity of the sound, and the shape of the resultant performance, and it has stayed with me since then.

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The interview was conducted by email between 24 February 2007 – 4 August 2008

The Ashgate Research Companion to Experimental MusicRead the full interview here.

All the interviews from James Saunders can be found in The Ashgate Research Companion to Experimental Music.

The Ashgate Research Companion to Experimental Music: The Interviews

Posted by Maxine Cook, Marketing Assistant

James Saunders has uploaded his interview with Bernhard Günter.

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Interview with Bernhard Günter:

Meticulous placement and balancing of sound is readily apparent in Bernhard Günter’s work, whether electro-acoustically composed or, more recently, improvised. Whilst he points out its wide dynamic range, it is essentially a quiet music, one which seeks to draw us in as listeners. The body of work for which he is perhaps best known – the series of recordings beginning with his 1993 release Un peu de neige salie – explores a reduced palette of glitch sounds, working with highly detailed textures which have an innate complexity. Günter’s approach foregrounds aspects of sounds that otherwise go unnoticed, whether due to existing on the border of sound and silence, or their perceived ancillary status as musical material. Whilst he is at pains to point out that he does not consider his music experimental, given it is ostensibly result rather than process oriented, this particular concern has much in common with other practitioners in the field. His processing of sampled sounds strips them of their more conventional meanings, allowing him to work more closely with them as abstract sonic materials. His recent improvisation projects have continued to explore this reduced soundworld, working first with Mark Wastell and Graham Halliwell as +minus, and later with Gary Smith as Klangstaub. Here too a slow, breath-paced layering of gradually changing drones allows the material’s detail to emerge over time.

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The interview was conducted by email between 2 January – 10 February 2004, with the postscript being added in August 2008.

The Ashgate Research Companion to Experimental MusicRead the full interview here.

All the interviews from James Saunders can be found in The Ashgate Research Companion to Experimental Music.

The Museums of Contemporary Art

Author of Ashgate classic title The Museums of Contemporary Art, J Pedro Lorente, spoke at the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies at Newcastle University on Wednesday 17th June, giving a seminar on Open-air museums: a designation in vogue for public art in urban districts.

Art collections permanently exhibited in public spaces are sometimes called ‘open air museums”. This notion has been constructed over time, building on historical precedents and in dialectic interaction with other related concepts like ‘sculpture gardens’. The result is not a clear-cut definition, but a changing perception, carrying diverse connotations according to different languages and cultural contexts. The modern paradigm was set by Middelheim Open Lucht Museum created in 1950 by the municipality of Antwerp in a suburban park, emulated in the French-speaking University of Liège, since the creation in 1977 of a Musée en Plein Air in the campus of Sart Tilman; some features were slighly different in another famous instance, the Musée de sculpture à plein air de la Ville de Paris, inaugurated in 1980 on a riverbank between Île Saint-Louis and the Gare d’Austerlitz. But the triumph of a post-modern return to the city centre was heralded by the founding in 1972-79 of the polemical Museo de Escultura al Aire Libre in Madrid. Its influence has been enormous in Spain and other Latin countries, where many collections of public art gathered as part of urban regeneration processes have been proudly labeled as museums. Are they?

The Museums of contemporary artThe Museums of Contemporary Art

Where, how, by whom and for what were the first museums of contemporary art created? These are the key questions addressed by Pedro Lorente in this new and expanded edition of his groundbreaking 1998 study, Cathedrals of Urban Modernity. In it he explores the concept and history of museums of contemporary art, and the shifting ways in which they have been imagined and presented. The first part of the book examines the paradigm of the Musée des Artistes Vivants in Paris and its equivalents in the rest of Europe during the nineteenth century. The second part, consisting of entirely new material, takes the story from 1930 to the present. An epilogue reviews recent museum developments in the last decades.