Tag Archives: early modern women

Women’s Literacy in Early Modern Spain and the New World wins the 2012 SSEMW award for a Collaborative Project

Posted by Alyssa Berthiaume, Marketing Coordinator

Anne J. Cruz, Professor of Spanish and Cooper Fellow at the University of Miami, and Rosilie Hernández, Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Illinois at Chicago, combined forces in editing Women’s Literacy in Early Modern Spain and the New World. Their efforts were rewarded, [quite literally,] with the announcement that their book was named the Prize Winner for Collaborative Project by the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women (SSEMW).   The prize was announced last month to over 700 scholars attending the Sixteenth Century Society Conference in Cincinnati, Ohio.

The SSEMW is a network of scholars, who besides granting awards for outstanding scholarship, sponsor conference sessions, maintain a website and listserv and support one another’s scholarly work and achievements.  Given that the SSEMW’s focus is on the “study [of] women and their contributions to the cultural, political, economic, or social spheres of the early modern period,” it is of no surprise that the Cruz-Hernandezbook would catch the Society’s attention.

The essays in their volume move from discussions of women’s education and the role of convents to examples of cultural literacy in literature and the arts; and address both major writers such as Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and María de Zayas, as well as lesser known figures such as Ana de Mendoza.

The volume’s foci were not all that the SSEMW took note of. The award committee called it an “exemplary piece of scholarship” and avowed that Women’s Literacy in Early Modern Spain and the New World is:

a serious and valuable volume, realizing the full potential of collaborative work as it brings together the work of top experts to extend considerably the scholarship to date on women’s participation in the written cultures of early modern Spain and the New World

The Cruz- Hernández volume contributes significantly to the study of gendered literacy by investigating the ways in which women became familiarized with the written word, not only by means of the education received, but through visual art, drama and literary culture.  For all these reasons, the SSEMW awarded them this most-deserving prize.

See the full evaluation of this title from the SSEMW, and the full list of prizewinners

Women’s Literacy in Early Modern Spain and the New World is edited by Anne J. Cruz and Rosilie Hernández

Contributors to the volume: Anne J. Cruz, Nieves Baranda Leturio, Montserrat Pérez-Toribio, Trevor J. Dadson, Darcy R. Donahue, Elizabeth Teresa Howe, Stephanie L. Kirk, Clara E. Herrera, Adrienne L. Martín, Alicia R. Zuese, Yolanda Gamboa-Tusquets, Rosilie Hernández, Emilie L. Bergmann.

Women’s Literacy in Early Modern Spain and the New World is one of several titles included in Ashgate’s Women and Gender in the Early Modern World series.

Ashgate at the Attending to Early Modern Women symposium

Posted by Erika Gaffney, Ashgate’s Publisher for Literary Studies and Women & Gender Studies

During the first weekend of November, the atmosphere was electric at the international, interdisciplinary symposium Attending to Early Modern Women.  Scholars descended from all over the US, as well as from Canada and the UK, on the University of Maryland’s College Park campus for the eighth iteration of this dynamic triennial gathering, to address the theme of “Conflict, Concord” in the context of early modern women’s studies.

Kudos and thanks to the University of Maryland’s Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies, organizer and host of the event!   Established in 1981, CRBS plays a vital role in fostering intellectual exchange between disciplines in the arts and humanities and allied fields.

The CRBS staff are to be congratulated not only for their successful coordination of multiple plenary lectures and workshops to do with early modern women, but for their innovation in composing advice roundtables for today’s professional women, whether in early or mid-career.  In the Early Career Professional Development session I offered guidance about working with academic presses in the form of a list of “Publishing Dos and Don’ts.”  Before long, documents relating to this session will be posted online (along with materials relating to a parallel session on Mid-Career Development); see also the bottom of this posting for the content of the “Publishing Dos and Don’ts” handout mentioned above.

Highlights of the 2009 incarnation of Attending include, but are not limited to:

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Women and Gender in the Early Modern World series reaches its 10th birthday!

2009 marks the tenth anniversary of the setting up of Ashgate’s series, Women and Gender in the Early Modern World. This will be celebrated at the forthcoming Attending to Early Modern Women conference at the University of Maryland, November 5-7 (see program for details). Erika Gaffney will be attending this conference for Ashgate, so if you’re there do drop by and see us!

The Women and Gender in the Early Modern World series was established in 1999, with series editors Allyson Poska and Abby Zanger, and one of the early books in the series was Maternal Measures: Figuring Caregiving in the Early Modern Period, edited by Naomi J. Miller and Naomi Yavneh. It won a Collaborative Projects Award 2001 from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women, and received some glowing reviews: Continue reading