Tag Archives: Gender studies

Call for Papers: Playthings in Early Modernity: Party Games, Word Games, Mind Games (edited collection)

Posted by Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager

Contributions are sought for an interdisciplinary collection of essays to be edited by Allison Levy and published by Ashgate Publishing in the new book series, Cultures of Play, 1300-1700 (series editor Bret Rothstein). Dedicated to early modern playfulness, this series serves two purposes. First, it recounts the history of wit, humor, and games, from jokes and sermons, for instance, to backgammon and blind man’s buff. Second, in addressing its topic – ludic culture – broadly, Cultures of Play also provides a forum for reconceptualizing the play elements of early modern economic, political, religious, and social life.

Within this framework, PLAYTHINGS IN EARLY MODERNITY: PARTY GAMES, WORD GAMES, MIND GAMES emphasizes the rules of the game(s) as well as the breaking of those rules: playmates and game changers, teammates and tricksters, matchmakers and deal breakers, gamblers and grifters, scripts and ventriloquism, charades and masquerades, game pieces and pawns. Thus, a ‘plaything’ is understood as both an object and a person, and play, in early modern Europe (1300-1700), is treated not merely as a pastime, a leisurely pursuit, but also as a pivotal part of daily life, a strategic psychosocial endeavor: Why do we play games – with and upon each other as well as ourselves? Who are the winners, and who are the losers? Desirable essays will also consider the spaces of play: from the stage to the street, from the pulpit to the piazza, from the bedroom to the brothel: What happens when players go ‘out of bounds,’ or when games go ‘too far’? We seek new and innovative scholarship at the nexus of material culture/the study of objects, performance studies, and game theory. We welcome proposals from a wide range of disciplines, including gender studies, childhood studies, history, languages and literature, theater history, religious studies, the history and philosophy of science, philosophy, psychology, and the history of art and visual culture.

PLAYTHINGS IN EARLY MODERNITY: PARTY GAMES, WORD GAMES, MIND GAMES will be an illustrated volume, with individual contributors responsible for any permission and/or art acquisition fees. Final essays, of approximately 8,000 words (incl. notes), and all accompanying b&w illustrations/permissions will be due no later than January 15, 2015. For consideration, please send an abstract (max. 500 words), a preliminary list of illustrations (if applicable), and a CV to Allison Levy (allisonlevy2@gmail.com or playthingsvolume@gmail.com) by September 15, 2014. Notifications will be emailed by the end of September.

From Cape Town to Kabul: Rethinking Strategies for Pursuing Women’s Human Rights – ‘a fascinating read’

From Cape Town to KabulPenelope Andrews’ book From Cape Town to Kabul: Rethinking Strategies for Pursuing Women’s Human Rights is classified as ‘Research Essential’ by Baker & Taylor YBP Library Services. It generates challenging and complex questions about the achievement of gender equality.

The author examines and compares gender inequality in societies undergoing political, economic and legal transformation, and looks at two countries – South Africa and Afghanistan – in particular. These two societies serve as counterpoints through which the book engages, in a nuanced and novel way, with the many broader issues that flow from the attempts in newly democratic societies to give effect to the promise of gender equality. Developing the idea of ‘conditional interdependence’, the book suggests a new approach based on the communitarian values which underpin newly democratic societies and would allow women’s rights to gain momentum and reap greater benefits.

‘This book is written with passion for and deep experience of struggles for women’s rights in different parts of the globe. Professor Andrews deals with the vexed issue of the role of local cultures in defining women’s rights in both South Africa and Afghanistan. She departs from the traditional western feminist goal of autonomy for women and argues instead for recognition of women’s “conditional interdependence”. This book is bold and insightful, a rich comparative analysis, with a transformational purpose.’    Hilary Charlesworth, The Australian National University, Australia

‘Andrews asks the hard questions that should cause us to re-examine our assumptions about the freight attached to the language of human rights, political and legal strategies for achieving substantive equality, and the contestation within the feminist discourse and legal theory. Beautifully written, this book is a fabulous resource for academic institutions and communities.’    Val Napoleon, University of Victoria, Canada

‘The author analyses the obstacles to achieving gender equality in two very different countries and concludes that there is not “a one size fits all” solution. The book is a fascinating read. And its message is timely: we cannot give up, we must continue to seek ways to meet the challenge of gender inequality.’   Kate O’Regan, Justice of CCT of South Africa

‘In this fascinating read, the author addresses the critical complexities of women’s rights in transitional societies. Developing the intriguing concept of “conditional interdependence”, she challenges feminist conceptualizations based primarily on personal autonomy. Whether in her native South Africa or Afghanistan, progress occurs only with the support of the community of women AND men.’    Adrien K. Wing, University of Iowa College of Law, USA

About the Author: Penelope Andrews is Professor of Law and Dean at Albany Law School, New York. She is the co-editor of Post-Apartheid Constitutions: Perspectives On South Africa’s Basic Law (Ohio University Press, 2001) and Law and Rights: Global Perspectives on Constitutionalism and Governance (Vandeplas Publishing, 2008).

Gender in a Global / Local World

Posted by Kirstin Howgate, Publisher, Politics

You may have already seen many of the titles we have in our Gender in a Global / Local World series because we’ve 19 books published.  Established in early 2000, this series features monographs and collections which explore gendered tensions in a ‘global/local world’.

“…rapidly becoming a publication venue of choice for feminist work in international relations.”  Politics and Gender

Celebrating 10 years since our first book was published, 2013 will see a flurry of exciting new titles from the evolving interaction between bodies and states, understanding the meaning of (im)mobility in people’s lives, how the theories and practices of mainstream International Relations (IR) can silence the experiences of wartime sexual violence and in-depth analysis of the multifaceted manifestations of gender and conflict.

To add these key books to your collection or to be part of the series, see the series webpage for more details and to sign up to our Email newsletter to receive notification of new publications, events and special offers.

  

The series editors for Gender in a Global / Local World are Professor Jane Parpart, Visiting Professor, University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA; Associate Professor Pauline Gardiner Barber, Dalhousie University, Canada and Professor Marianne Marchand, Universidad de las Américas-Puebla, Mexico.

Women and Celebrity in Victorian England

A little something for International Women’s Day!

Women, Portraiture and the Crisis of Identity in Victorian England

The power of celebrity – and specifically its effects on women – was as much of a phenomenon in Victorian times as it is today. Colleen Denney’s book Women, Portraiture and the Crisis of Identity in Victorian England examines the images and lives of four prominent Victorian women who steered their way through scandal to forge unique identities.

The book shows the effect of celebrity, and even notoriety, on the lives of Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Lady Dilke, Millicent Garrett Fawcett, and Sarah Grand.

For these women, their portraits were more than speaking likenesses-whether painted or photographic, they became crucial tools the women used to negotiate their controversial identities.

Read the book’s introductory chapter