Personal highlights from our Women’s History list (no.4)

March is Women’s History month, and in celebration we are publishing a series of blog posts highlighting some of our favourite Ashgate Women’s History books (we’re very proud of our Women’s History publishing!).

The fourth pick comes from Meredith Norwich, Ashgate’s Commissioning Editor for Art and Visual Culture. Her choice is Women and Things, 1750–1950, edited by Maureen Daly Goggin and Beth Fowkes Tobin, both from Arizona State University.

I love the fact that this volume casts a light on women as producers of all manner of arts and crafts–including my personal favorite, butter sculpture!–rather than as only consumers.

About the book: 

In contrast to much current scholarship on women and material culture which focuses primarily on women as consumers, this essay collection provides case studies of women who produced material objects.

The volume is interdisciplinary with essays by art historians, social historians, literary critics, rhetoricians, and museum curators. The scope of the volume is international with essays on eighteenth-century German silhouettes, Australian aboriginal ritual practices, Brittany mourning rites, and Soviet-era recipes that provide a comparative framework for the majority of essays which focus on British and North American women who lived and worked in the long nineteenth century.

About the Editors: Maureen Daly Goggin is Associate Chair in the Department of English at Arizona State University, USA. Beth Fowkes Tobin is Professor in the Department of English at Arizona State University, USA.

Dr Maureen Daly Goggin’s profile page on the Arizona State University
Maureen Daly Goggin’s website
Dr Beth Fowkes Tobin’s profile page on the Arizona State University

Full information about Women and Things is available on Ashgate’s website

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