CCUE prize for Kevin Killeen

Another day, another prize!

We’ve just heard that Kevin Killeen has been awarded the CCUE Book Prize 2010 for his book Biblical Scholarship, Science and Politics in Early Modern England: Thomas Browne and the Thorny Place of Knowledge. The prize is awarded annually for the best scholarly book in the field of English studies by an early-career academic.

Biblical Scholarship, Science and Politics in Early Modern England

This is not the first time Kevin Killeen’s book has caught the attention of an award panel. It was also shortlisted for the History of Science Society Watson Davis and Helen Miles Davis Prize 2010.

Other reviews:

‘The Thorny Place of Knowledge shows new sides to Browne’s religious, scientific and rhetorical practices. Its particular strengths are its revisonary focus on Browne’s thought in Pseudodoxia and its ability to tease out unexpected details that illuminate larger patterns of though and experience in the second half of the seventeenth century.’    Renaissance Quarterly

‘Browne is a pivotal figure, and Killeen’s book shows where Browne’s writings reveal some of the fault-lines in the intellectual culture of seventeenth-century England. Browne was also a very subtle writer, and the critic must delve below the smooth surface of his prose to see where he papers over the cracks in his philosophy. Kevin Killeen is a careful reader of Browne’s prose, and he offers us an instructive lead in this task.’    British Society for Literature and Science

‘The sophistication and wealth of detail in this well-argued book preclude a fair summary in a brief review. … This excellent book, then, will be of interest to scholars across disciplines, especially those engaged in the history of science, the history of ideas, and literary criticism. Killeen seems to have mastered all of the relevant traditional and recent scholarship…’    1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era

Visit Kevin Killeen’s profile page on the University of York’s website

More information about Biblical Scholarship, Science and Politics in Early Modern England: Thomas Browne and the Thorny Place of Knowledge.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s