Records of Girlhood, Volume Two: An Anthology of Nineteenth-Century Women’s Childhoods Makes a Great Sequel to the 2000 Edition

Posted by Alyssa Berthiaume, Marketing Coordinator

Records of GirlhoodRecords of Girlhood: Volume Two, edited by Valerie Sanders, is a follow-up to her well-received 2000 anthology of autobiographical accounts of childhood by nineteenth-century women writers. This wholly new publication, also published in Ashgate’s Nineteenth Century Series, features 14 women of note, including children’s author Frances Hodgson Burnett, political activist Emmeline Pankhurt, and the sensation novelist Mary Elizabeth Braddon.

Sanders writes:

“This collection of narratives…offers both a continuation of the earlier volume and an opportunity to review the development of critical interest in a genre which has lagged behind the much greater focus on male-authored Victorian autobiographies.”

Claudia Nelson at Texas A&M University calls Volume 2 “an accessible and varied tapestry of girlhoods” and commends it for its readability, thought-provoking editorial commentary, detailed annotations and enthusiastic introduction.

For more information on this scrupulously edited collection of life-writing by women attempting to make sense of how their childhood experiences shaped the women they became, we recommend reading Valerie Sanders’s introduction to Volume Two, which is available on the Ashgate website.

Valerie Sanders is Professor of English at the University of Hull. Previous publications include the first Records of Girlhood collection (2000), The Brother-Sister Culture in Nineteenth-Century Literature: From Austen to Woolf (2002), and The Tragi-Comedy of Victorian Fatherhood (2009). She is currently a contributor to Pickering and Chatto’s Selected Works of Margaret Oliphant. Click here to view Sanders profile page on the University of Hull website.

Interested in other Ashgate titles on girlhood? Check out:

Constructing Girlhood through the Periodical Press, 1850–1915

Conduct Books for Girls in Enlightenment France

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