Tag Archives: Renaissance Literature

CFP: Allusion, Indirection, Enigma: Flirting with Early Modern Uncertainty

Posted by Bret Rothstein

Call for papers: Allusion, Indirection, Enigma: Flirting with Early Modern Uncertainty

Renaissance Society of America (Boston, March 31–April 2, 2016) #RSA16

Session organized by Bret Rothstein, Indiana University – Bloomington

Please send an abstract (up to 150 words) and a 300-word vita by May 31, 2015 to brothste@indiana.edu

Augustine may have believed in validity in interpretation, but the history of early modern Europe is thick with texts, objects, and ideas that seem to move in a very different direction. A striking number of images, texts, behaviors, musical scores, buildings, and even naturally-occurring objects seem designed, in a sense, to send the mind in any direction but the supposedly “right” one. (The matter becomes especially interesting with respect to “jokes of nature,” which might speak to a kind of divine mischief.) But why might this be the case? What was the value of getting things – very loosely conceived – wrong? In an attempt to begin answering such questions, this session is dedicated to the study of interpretive challenges, from theatrical productions to mathematical treatises, and from art works to naturally occurring objects. Its purpose is to promote conversation among scholars from across a range of disciplines about the social and cultural value of interpretation’s ugly stepchildren (confusion, misperception, ambivalence, and incomprehension, among others).

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Bret Rothstein teaches in the Department of the History of Art at Indiana University, Bloomington, and is the editor for Ashgate’s Cultures of Play series.

Christopher Marlowe at 450

This is a guest post by Sara Munson Deats

christopher marlowe at 450As the baptism date, if not birthday, of internationally renowned English playwright, poet, and translator Christopher Marlowe, February 26 seems an auspicious day to celebrate the recent publication of Christopher Marlowe at 450. The year 2014 saw the 450th anniversary of Marlowe’s birth. To commemorate this significant anniversary, the book evaluates the scholarship and criticism treating all aspects of the poet/playwright–his biography, his individual poems, including his translations, and his seven plays–to discover what has been covered, what has been neglected, and what areas scholarship and criticism might focus on in the future.

There has never been a retrospective on Marlowe as comprehensive and up-to-date in appraising the Marlovian landscape. Each chapter has been written by an eminent Marlovian scholar, and in addition to considering all of Marlowe’s dramas and poetry, the volume contains chapters exploring the following special topics: critical approaches to Marlowe, Marlowe’s plays in performance; Marlowe and theater history; electronic resources for Marlowe research; and Marlowe’s biography. The volume thus provides an indispensable source of information not only for Marlowe students and scholars but for anyone interested in Renaissance drama and poetry. And because interest in every aspect of Marlowe studies has burgeoned since the turn of the century, it seems appropriate at this time to present a comprehensive assessment of traditional and contemporary approaches, and to predict future lines of inquiry into the life and work of this fascinating poet and playwright.

The book is dedicated to the Marlowe Society of America, and to the cadre of scholars throughout history who have devoted their time and talent to refining our understanding of Christopher Marlowe, and of his contributions to English literature.

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Sara Munson Deats is Distinguished University Professor of English at the University of South Florida, and editor, with Robert A. Logan (Hartford), of Christopher Marlowe at 450.

Contributors to the book: Sara Munson Deats; Robert A. Logan; Ruth Lunney; Tom Rutter; Stephen J. Lynch; Leah S. Marcus; Patrick Cheney; M. L. Stapleton; Richard Wilson; David Bevington; Christopher Matusiak; David McInnis; Constance Brown Kuriyama

Celebrating Christopher Marlowe’s 450th Birthday

Posted by Hattie Wilson, Marketing Executive

2014 marks the 450th anniversary of two of England’s most important literary figures: William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe.

Christopher Marlowe was baptised 26th February 1564, exactly two months before Shakespeare who was immensely influenced by the dramatist. Although Marlowe penned poetry and translated classical literature, he is best known as a playwright. In 2002, he was commemorated in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey with a panel on the Hubbard memorial stained glass window.

In March, Fourth Monkey will take part in Marlowe 450, presenting his full works at The Marlowe Theatre in association with The Marlowe Society and the University of Kent. This will include productions of Doctor Faustus and The Massacre of Paris, which will be staged in the crypt of Canterbury Cathedral. The Marlowe Festival will also stage the complete works of the playwright in Cambridge.

2014 looks to be an exciting time for the Marlovian scholar!

Here are just some of Ashgate’s books on Christopher Marlowe:

Christopher Marlowe the CraftsmanMarlowe’s Ovid: The Elegies in the Marlowe Canon (M.L. Stapleton)

Christopher Marlowe (Robert A. Logan) in The Univeristy Wits series

Christopher Marlowe the Craftsman: Lives, Stage and Page (Sarah K. Scott and M.L. Stapleton)

Placing the Plays of Christopher Marlowe: Fresh Cultural Contexts (Sara Munson Deats and Robert A. Logan)

Shakespeares MarloweShakespeare’s Marlowe: The Influence of Christopher Marlowe on Shakespeare’s Artistry (Robert A. Logan) – Winner of the 2009 Roma Gill Prize, awarded by the Marlowe Society of America, and a Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2007

Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson: New Directions in Biography (Takashi Kozuka and J.R. Mulryne)